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M.2 Enablement Kit for blades

chuckk281
Trusted Contributor

M.2 Enablement Kit for blades

Hiro had an SSD question regarding the new M.2 specification:

 

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Hello,

 

Does anyone know how new M.2 option for blades is connected to controller?

If customer buys P244br, M.2 dual 64GB option and 2 x SAS HDDs, which is true?

 

(1) M.2 SSDs and SAS HDDs are all connected to P244br.

(2) M.2 SSDs are connected to B140i and SAS HDDs are connected to P244br.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

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Reply from John:

 

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Your second scenario is correct. The M.2 will always be controlled by the B140i while the HDDs will be controlled by whichever controller is installed.

 

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Question from Hiro:

 

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What happens if customer buys M.2 dual 64GB option and 2 x SATA HDDs and doesn't buy P244br/H244br?

Are M.2 SSDs and SATA HDDs all connected to B140i?

 

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And from John:

 

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Yes, in this scenario they would all be controlled by the B140i.

 

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Info on what is M.2 from Wikipedia:

 

M.2, formerly known as the Next Generation Form Factor (NGFF), is a specification for internally mounted computer expansion cards and associated connectors. It replaces the mSATA standard, which uses the PCI Express Mini Card physical layout. M.2's more flexible physical specification that allows different module widths and lengths, together with more advanced features, makes the M.2 more suitable for solid-state storage applications in general, especially when used in small devices like ultrabooks or tablets.

Computer bus interfaces provided through the M.2 connector, together with supported logical interfaces, are a superset to those defined by the SATA Express interface. Essentially, the M.2 standard is a small form factor implementation of the SATA Express interface (which provides support for PCI Express 3.0 and Serial ATA 3.0), with the addition of an internal USB 3.0 interface. The M.2 connector can have different keying notches that denote various uses of M.2 modules.

 

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