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Statistics for measuring people's performance

 
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Honored Contributor

Statistics for measuring people's performance

Hello!

Althought the subject is a little "hard", I would like to comment with you what do you think about what statistical values are good and will measure a HelpDesk performance with justice.

For example, we have a "First Contact" time, wich is the time between the registration of a call by the operator and the call to the customer by the specialist.

If our objective is to provide a 5 minutes first contact time, and we want to pay money to our specialists if they get this objective, wich statistic value is good for this measure?

If we use the mean, an outlayer can break the statistic very easyly...

Antonio
15 REPLIES 15
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Honored Contributor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

Just a few thoughts:
First Contact is a good measure as to the responsiveness to a request, but if the response does not add value, what good is it?

In addition to first contact, there is "time to resolve". Again, if the resolution was quick but is not of value, what good is it?

Then there is "quality of response" which is highly subjective. Maybe the answer is right, but it's not what was expected. How can you measure or who should measure quality?
"Downtime is a Crime."
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Honored Contributor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

Well... I was talking about statistics, but your thought about other metric is interesting.

We use mainly 3 metrics: time to first contact, time to escalation and time to resolution.

We only can measure quality in terms of change: a good quality change is that change done within time scheduled, within the budget assigned (hours or money), with the lowest impact to the customers AND a change that causes no aditional calls or problems.

A metric for the "quality of the response" is *very* difficult to find, and I think that quality needs to be evaluated from the customer point of view, and not from the technical one. Using this approach, a good customer satisfaction survey and tracking the evolution.

Antonio
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Honored Contributor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

Statistics like this should be used only to identify whether someone is performing at expected levels. Tuning compensation to it creates pressure to beat the statistics, which may not be the best way to serve your customers or employ your staff.

For example, one HelpDesk operator received 10 calls in an hour. He cuts a ticket as quickly as possible and gets out to answer the next call. As a result, the time from the inbound call to the second level call is reduced for all ten calls.

A second operator also receives 10 calls in an hour. She spends a few minutes in troubleshooting on 8 of the calls and as a result does not escalate five of those issues to second level. Her average time escalate an inbound call to second level is higher because she spent more time with the customer, who probably received better service. Yet the simple metric of time to escalation doesn't adequately measure her performance, which not only helped the customer right away, but left the second level staff out of the process, meaning they could work on other problems.

The first operator, having found the key to success, exploits the statistics for his own benefit. The second operator, concerned more with helping the customer, ends up hurting her performance review by not measuring up to the bar.

In a call center taking orders for Yanni's latest albumn, base statistics may provide a good floor for performance measurement. In a less cut-and-dried environment like a general Help Desk, where almost any question can get asked and expect an answer, statistics cannot measure the difficulty of the problem, the effort expended to resolve it, or the quality of the answer. You need more subjective information for that part of the evaluation.
"Hope springs eternal."
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Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

Hello all!

A few of my thoughts...

As a scientific, technical person, I value Cheryl's "quality of response" above all else; and yes, that's highly subjective. On any help desk survey this would be the area to which I would look to measure the desk's return on investment. As a user of a service, I'm willing to be somewhat patient if I know I can expect and receive value, a priori.

One of the metrics my organization's help desk tracks is "call abandon rate". It's "good" if a Help Desk answers a new call before the new caller tiers of waiting, even if that means "abandoning" the original caller to put that original call into a service queue. This translates as "good" for Help Desk statistics -- answered calls are high; the abandon rate is low; and you can advertise that everyone gets instant gratification!

Conversely, I might argue that a higher "abandon rate" is actually "good". After all, it suggests that perhaps more staff is needed; or that more education of the users of the service is required; or that users are receiving a high quality of response to their questions in the first place. This is essentialy the theme that Mike discusses above.

What's that old adage? Figures never lie, but liers always figure. You really have to analyze your data, and you really have to be careful when considering what your measurements mean. It sure seems like a good, old, subjective questionnaire is a great way to measure just how effective a service you're providing.

...JRF...
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Honored Contributor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

There is a very good measure of customer satisfaction...that is re-enrollment rates...the only problem with this measurement mechanism is that once you have lost the customer, you probably won't get them back.

However, a pay as you go service model does inherently capture this data...customers only call when they think they will get excellent, relevant service.
Omniback and NT problems? double check name resolution, DNS/HOSTS...
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Honored Contributor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

I am now so glad I don't have to review the Help Desk staff performance here.
I guess I would offer this....Have you tried doing what others do. I mean keep your internal statistics (in whatever fashion you feel is most fair and relevant). But to truly evaluate Help Desk performance, is to me, tied to the word Help. Did they really Help?
So....I would suggest some sort of follow up survey back with the customer. Doesn't have to be every call..just random... Make enough of these to check and you will find out who was really helped...and who really did 'HELP' and not just 'play the system'.
Does this take time?...Yes...Is it a bother?...Yes....
But how much time and effort is being spent trying to figure out a system that can't be gotten around. And if your looking for customer satisfaction .. then ask the customer if they were satisfied.
Just a thought,
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Occasional Visitor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

Maybe I am late. But I just join the fforum & interest in this post.

I think there will be 4 stages in managing a customer call, I call it 4C -- Connect, Complete, Confirm & Call Back.

Connect is to measure the time between customer call in to the first technician ansew the call, or we could call ir response time

Complete is the problem resolution time includind escalation

Confirm is to confirm with the customer the problem is really fix or not after the technician close the case. It could be measure by case re-open rate

For call back, it just like a short random survey to see what we can improve & if there any other isuues we should follow-up. It would be better if the survey is done by third-party.
Work is suppose be fun
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Valued Contributor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

I agree with cheryl , ( if theres no value to the call , what use is it?) and I believe the value should be long term resolution and not a five minute resolution.

Measuring statistics against individuals makes the work environment unpleasant. The main focus should be the TEAM , .i.e. IF someone is praised ,the TEAM should be praised. If you have a good TEAM, knowledge is passed around, there is no real reliance on other people because each person in the team are capable of doing each others task, so call response times , resolutions etc.. would be much quicker .
As we all know, the customer has the last say , and we here have service delivery managers who liase with the customer regarding the business , and end result is a report is produced showing , server uptime (100%)
User avaliablity ( 100%), Performance of the server (100%) , Batch Job success (100%)
This report is produced every month, and any problems are pointed out at this stage ..

Just a few thoughts
Seek and you shall find
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Occasional Visitor

Re: Statistics for measuring people's performance

Hi guys

I am tasked to do a Helpdesk Productivity Model, does any one has a sample templates on how you guys measure the people's performance etc? Many thanks.