Comware Based
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Switch E5500G (JE088A) ASIC question

Carsick
Occasional Visitor

Switch E5500G (JE088A) ASIC question

Hi

 

New here, so treat me kindly, please.

 

We have a query which I was told by HP to post here. Am trying to troubleshoot a problem and just want to confirm some facts.

 

The question is, does an individual ASIC in a switch control a set of six ports, or is it something else. Reason for the question is we have some device on our network which is occasional flooding the network and the switch counters are showing high levels of abort packets. What we are seeing is that the number of abort packets are very similar level on ports 1 to 6, but then a very different similar number on ports 7 to 12 and so on.

 

I need to rule out whether the number of aborts are based on the ASIC or some other aspect of the internal workings of the switch, or is to do with the devices connected at the other end of the links. Obviously, devices connected at 100Mbs are seeing significantly higher numbers, but for devices connected, at the same speed on the ports, the number of aborts are very similar but in groups of 6.

 

Anyone know the answer to this.

 

Carrick

 

 

 

P.S. This thread has been moved from ProCurve / ProVision-Based to Comware-Based. -HP Forum Moderator

3 REPLIES
Tijl van der Steeg
Valued Contributor

Re: Switch E5500G (JE088A) ASIC question

The amount of port on one ASIC depends on the switch. I think it's 4 for the 2610 for example. Could very well be 6 on the 5500...I hope someone can clarify this.

Sunday_1
Advisor

Re: Switch E5500G (JE088A) ASIC question

What does the term "aborts" mean for E5500Gs? Nobody could answer this queston to me.

Carsick
Occasional Visitor

Re: Switch E5500G (JE088A) ASIC question


Sunday_1 wrote:

What does the term "aborts" mean for E5500Gs? Nobody could answer this queston to me.



These refer to packets that are not sent out on the port. Flow control usually takes care of most of this issue, but not always. In our case we have a device sending out a high number of packets (probably some form of multicast) which is faster than the end device can handle. The switch then throws away the packets it can not deliver - aborts. This is worse where the end receiving device is running at a slower speed eg 100Mbs so the counters are higher. In an ideal network you should not see any abort packets.

 

Hope that helps

Carrick