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FAST REBOOT

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Samuel Winful
Occasional Contributor

FAST REBOOT

How can I do a "fast reboot" of a N-class server without the system having to go through the long memory check, etc? Thanks.
5 REPLIES
CHRIS ANORUO
Honored Contributor

Re: FAST REBOOT

The exercise is very important for you system healthy run state.
When We Seek To Discover The Best In Others, We Somehow Bring Out The Best In Ourselves.
Kofi ARTHIABAH
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: FAST REBOOT

Try this:

At the IPL

> CO (configuration)
>FB ON (fast boot on)
nothing wrong with me that a few lines of code cannot fix!
Andy Monks
Honored Contributor

Re: FAST REBOOT

Samuel,

I have to agree with Chris. Leave fastboot off. For customer/production systems, the cost of having it spend a few minutes checking memory far outways the potential downtime of a crash caused by a memory failure.

That said, whenever I'm setting up machines or know I'm going to be rebooting a machine a lot (even customer machines), I'll turn fastboot on. However, I always turn it off afterwards.

Btw, I thought the N-Class memory check was pretty fast (compared to the T-Class anyway).
CHRIS ANORUO
Honored Contributor

Re: FAST REBOOT

Hi Samuel,

To add to Andy's answer, it experience that counts in this business. Be on the save side of caution and learn more from your peers.


Cheers!
When We Seek To Discover The Best In Others, We Somehow Bring Out The Best In Ourselves.
Stefan Farrelly
Honored Contributor

Re: FAST REBOOT


Im afraid I have to disagree. Having FASTBOOT ON is fine in my experience. Most of the HP servers we use stay up for a long time, few reboots, so not often is a memory check after a reboot going to be run to find a problem. Instead, the diagnostic software (OnlineDiag) is running on the servers all the time continuously checking for memory errors. This should obviously then be the preferred method to detect memory problems.

It is these daemons that detect memory errors and report them via logfiles/email warning you of bit errors and deallocations and impending memory failure requiring replacement. In my experience well into the 99% of all memory problem are picked up by the diagnostic software, not during reboots.
Im from Palmerston North, New Zealand, but somehow ended up in London...