Digital Transformation
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Re: The paradox of personal privacy

mikeshaw747

I think that this is one of the toughest questions that will face legislators in the future. We get a lot of "free stuff" by givng up personal information, and most of us are giving up information without realizing it.

 

But legislators are getting wise to this. The NSA's possible tapping of European politicians' phones has come at an "interesting time".  The European Union is starting to look at privacy laws and commentators on BBC radio felt that the NSA's actions would make the EU more hard-line than they would otherwise have been.

 

There is even talk of people have the ability to have their history wiped from social media sites as a "human right". I remember reading that Gartner predicted that people would actually change their names by deed poll when they leave university because their youths would leave too much legacy.

 

The other area of technology that is bringing up privacy concerns is machine data or, "The Internet of Things". We could have information pouring off us from the sensors that either we carry or that are in the cities we walk and drive around. I think we haven't even touched the surface of this subject yet as regards public debate. 

 

It's going to be very difficult to create software to enact the privacy legislation because I think it's going to be changing so fast, and it's going to be very local - what you can do in Califorinia, for example, may be different to what you can in other states; and the same between counties in Europe and the rest of the world. 

Mike Shaw
Director Strategic Marketing

twitter.gif@mike_j_shaw
linkedin.gifMike Shaw

0 Kudos
About the Author

mikeshaw747

Mike has been with HPE for 30 years. Half of that time was in research and development, mainly as an architect. The other 15 years has been spent in product management, product marketing, and now, strategic marketing. .

Comments
mikeshaw747

I think that this is one of the toughest questions that will face legislators in the future. We get a lot of "free stuff" by givng up personal information, and most of us are giving up information without realizing it.

 

But legislators are getting wise to this. The NSA's possible tapping of European politicians' phones has come at an "interesting time".  The European Union is starting to look at privacy laws and commentators on BBC radio felt that the NSA's actions would make the EU more hard-line than they would otherwise have been.

 

There is even talk of people have the ability to have their history wiped from social media sites as a "human right". I remember reading that Gartner predicted that people would actually change their names by deed poll when they leave university because their youths would leave too much legacy.

 

The other area of technology that is bringing up privacy concerns is machine data or, "The Internet of Things". We could have information pouring off us from the sensors that either we carry or that are in the cities we walk and drive around. I think we haven't even touched the surface of this subject yet as regards public debate. 

 

It's going to be very difficult to create software to enact the privacy legislation because I think it's going to be changing so fast, and it's going to be very local - what you can do in Califorinia, for example, may be different to what you can in other states; and the same between counties in Europe and the rest of the world. 

Labels
Events
June 6 - 8, 2017
Las Vegas, Nevada
Discover 2017 Las Vegas
Join us for HPE Discover 2017 in Las Vegas. The event will be held at the Venetian | Palazzo from June 6-8, 2017.
Read more
Each Month in 2017
Online
Software Expert Days - 2017
Join us online to talk directly with our Software experts during online Expert Days. Find information here about past, current, and upcoming Expert Da...
Read more
View all