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What do I need for entry level fiber channel solution

John Rowan_2
Regular Advisor

What do I need for entry level fiber channel solution

I've been using internal SCSI and SCSI attached subsystems for my Linux servers. My customers' storage needs are growing and fiber channel based storage is where I should be moving. My problem is I run Linux (CentOS) and I have no idea what adapter(s) or storage subsystems I need to get up to speed with fiber channel. I only use Proliant servers (no Dell here) so if someone can give me a link or part numbers so I can take the plunge I'd appreciate it.
2 REPLIES
Patrick Terlisten
Honored Contributor

Re: What do I need for entry level fiber channel solution

Hello John,

check the HP StorageWorks MSA2324fc Single Controller SAN Starter-Kit. The PN is AJ955A. But you need to buy disks. Disks aren't included in this package. RHEL is supported with this system, so I don't see any problems with CentOS.

Here are the quickspecs:
http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/13187_div/13187_div.html

Regards,
Patrick
Best regards,
Patrick
TwoProc
Honored Contributor

Re: What do I need for entry level fiber channel solution

For starters, a Brocade switch (or two for redundancy) is the starting point. You'll then need a couple of fiber channel cards (HBA's is what they are called). And then you'll need the storage device itself. I'd think an MSA1000 would make a fine starter/play kit that you could get used cheaply (along with Brocade switches and cards). But for production purposes, you'd want something with support, etc. Talk to your HP storage rep, or HP certified storage vendor about their EVA products, and possibly their "Left-Hand" storage products. Both of these come in "starter" versions perfect for a small company with growing storage needs. Once you've got your SAN up, you can also start looking for a nice tape backup library and software. HP has those too.

Of course, ,if you just want to move to fiber, you don't *really* need a SAN, you could just plug directly into the storage array with a fiber connect. However, this limits you with what else you can do with the infrastucture - like hook up more computers and more storage for use in a SAN environment instead of a direct connect environment. But, depending on what you're doing, there can be a need for either solution.

A book is not a bad starting point:
http://www.amazon.com/Storage-Networks-Dummies-Christopher-Poelker/dp/0764524801

http://www.amazon.com/Using-SANs-NAS-Curtis-Preston/dp/0596001533/ref=pd_sim_b_3


Good luck.
We are the people our parents warned us about --Jimmy Buffett