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Extend File System

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Sylvie Vezina
Occasional Advisor

Extend File System

I increased one Volume Group and one Logical Volume. Now I have to extend File System related to these VG and LV. This File System is under Service Guard (DLVM). What is command to extend this File System without using Sam.

Thanks.

The best day is today
6 REPLIES
Kellogg Unix Team
Trusted Contributor

Re: Extend File System

If you have On-Line JFS installed, use fsadm. That will allow you to increase the FS w/o unmounting it. Else, unmount the filesystem, and use extendfs command & remount the FS.

...Manjeet
work is fun ! (my manager is standing behind me!!)
Sylvie Vezina
Occasional Advisor

Re: Extend File System

Could you give me the exact command to perform fsadm command.

Thanks
The best day is today
T G Manikandan
Honored Contributor

Re: Extend File System

Kellogg Unix Team
Trusted Contributor
Solution

Re: Extend File System

Assuming its vxfs FS, the syntax would be -

fsadm -F vxfs -b

do "man fsadm" for more details/options.

...Manjeet
work is fun ! (my manager is standing behind me!!)
Wodisch
Honored Contributor

Re: Extend File System

Hi Sylvie,

be careful as you need at least a little free space on a filesystem before you can successfully extend it! One MB seems to be fine...
So your commands would look like (/dev/vg01/lvol2 mounted on /mnt2 to be increased to 2GB):

lvextend -L 2048 /dev/vg01/lvol2
fsadm -F vxfs -b 2048M /mnt2

HTH,
Wodisch
Robert Thorneycroft
Valued Contributor

Re: Extend File System

Before doing any of the above commands you should first check which type of filesystem you actually have mounted on your logical volume, it might not be a good idea to just assume that it is vxfs.

In order to do this you should issue the command:
mkfs -m /dev/vg{xx}/lvol{y}
For instance:
mkfs -m /dev/vg00/lvol1
mkfs -F hfs -L /dev/vg00/lvol1 69632 22 7 8192 1024 16 10 60 6228
This indicates that the logical volume, in this case /stand was created as hfs.

mkfs -m /dev/vg00/lvol3
mkfs -F vxfs -o ninode=unlimited,bsize=1024,version=3,inosize=256,logsize=1024,nolargefiles /dev/vg00/lvol3 86016
Whereas the root logical volume shown above is created with vxfs.

Therefore depending on the results of this command you should substitute the correct term into the -F option of either fsadm or extendfs, depepending as mentioned by other posters as to whether you are performing the operation online or not.

Hope this helps a bit,

Robert Thorneycroft