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How to Know the space in HP-UX

Ramana.Sv
Frequent Advisor

How to Know the space in HP-UX

iam having HP-UX with oracle10G,how to know the space in the syete.

Thank you,
Ramna
4 REPLIES
V. Nyga
Honored Contributor

Re: How to Know the space in HP-UX

Hi,

with 'bdf' you can see your volumes and the disk space they use.
Some volumes will be at the same disk, so you have to compare.
With 'bdf -l' you'll see your local disks only.

Volkmar
*** Say 'Thanks' with Kudos ***
Yogeeraj_1
Honored Contributor

Re: How to Know the space in HP-UX

hi,

bdf should show you the file systems that have already been defined on the system.

You can use SAM to define further file systems if there is enough disk space available (of course). The SAM interface is quite intuitive and straight-forward to create as well as query existing disk spaces.

hope this helps too!

kind regards
yogeeraj
No person was ever honoured for what he received. Honour has been the reward for what he gave (clavin coolidge)
V. Nyga
Honored Contributor

Re: How to Know the space in HP-UX

Hi again,

yogeeraj is right - you can use 'vgdisplay' to see unallocated disk space.
PE Size (Mbytes) 16
Total PE 4374
Alloc PE 1465
Free PE 2909

PE Size gives you the size, so 2909x16MB is here the unallocated disk space.

V.
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A. Clay Stephenson
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: How to Know the space in HP-UX

The real answer is that it is extremely difficult to know. It's very easy to find the disks in use by LVM or VxVM. It's easy to find those used as swap or filesystems. It's easy to find those used as raw disks by databases. You can use ioscan -C disk -fn to identify all the disks visible to the system. The problem is that after identifying all the disks and accounting for the ones that are obviously in use, you may still have some disks left that APPEAR to be unused. They may very well be unused but they may not as well. It's possible (though not common) for an application to use a raw disk --- and unless you know the application there is no way to tell that this disk is in use.

The real answer to your question is to document, document, document.
If it ain't broke, I can fix that.