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Lets talk Vista... c",)

Percival
Advisor

Lets talk Vista... c",)

Are you using Windows Vista Already??? dont think so yet but this comming Feb maybe.... anyone of you got Q bout this new OS just post it here and LET'S TALK VISTA....No category Yet...Admin please include Vista for the category.
16 REPLIES
Hugo Tigre
Trusted Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Lets trash Vista instead...

I don't by cd's with drm protection, and i won't install a OS with the same thing...

I was hopping that this would be a good OS, but i already lost my hope, if i would install vista i would be giving to much control over to Microsoft.

Vista is the dictator of OS, especially to multimedia users.

I'm a windows / Linux user, but since i work with Microsoft systems, i have to dedicate more of my time to windows, but now, I'm thinking very seriously of migrating completely to LINUX.

hope this helps,
hugo
Jorge Pinto Leite
Respected Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Like it or not, Vista is going to be a major player in the OS market. So creating a Vista category is a "must be".
And, as usual, we all must expect big problems with Vista...

Jorge
Jorge Pinto Leite
Respected Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Like it or not, Vista is going to be a major player in the OS market. So creating a Vista category is a "must be".
And, as usual, we all must expect big problems with it...

Jorge
Jorge Pinto Leite
Respected Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Sorry to post twice... some problem happen in my Internet connection.
Hugo Tigre
Trusted Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

I now that sooner or later we "windows admins" will have no choice.

But people must be aware of what Microsoft is doing.

They are violating peoples rights, just like sony did, and still does by the way.

That's the problem with Microsoft, they already have a lot, and they dominate the market. Just look at IE7. what IE7 brings of new features, Firefox was already doing it for years back, Firefox is 10 times better than IE, especially with the right combination of extensions. The problem here, is that Microsoft doesn't even care about that, they have the necessary good programmers to do things the right way if they wanted it.

I'm not trashing vista or IE because they are from Microsoft, i think Microsoft has lot's of good software, but in this case they are terrible.

regards,
hugo
Tom Ridges
Advisor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Good shout Percival!

I've only used vista in the Lab, I cant see us moving to it for a while...

...let the bugs surface.

Just think, in a couple of years times we will all be saying "don't you remember the good old days of XP ;-)"

I'm personally a fan of MS OS, sure there are some things annoy me about it, but I'm interested in how it develops in the next few years...
Eino V
Honored Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Hi Pecival and All

I have installed Vista to one of my old computers (x2100, with 2.4 GHz pentium 4) to see if it works and how it looks like. There was no installation problems, all was recognized well, but the old Adaptec SCSI card has no drivers and the monitor was recognized only as generic monitor (it is Samsung).

It starts more quickly than XP Pro and the desktop looks better. Firewall seems to work, you must accept programs to start although you have started them. My old F-Secure did not work, I had to install a free AVG virus protection program.

All programs I have installed are working without problems. Deskjet 5655 installed without problems, Color laserjet 1600 had some problems but is now working ok. They are both in network connected to other computer.

Testing continues...

Eino
Ken wanderer
Trusted Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Like most, I am not a big fan of changes.
Mostly when there is no change in service, just - where to find things.
Just when I have Win 98se down to a science, we changed to Win 2K and then to XP Pro.
I see no difference in Win 2K and XP on a user level basis. Both are solid and reliable compared to the 95 and ME era. Let's hope that this isn't another goose egg like the Windows ME fiasco.

Some companies never learn, especially when there real big. I am very interested in Linux but don't have the time to start from scratch with it. The systems by me are almost always older and we run with that until we can't anymore. Just got rid of the last 98 box a few months ago, as it wont run our latest main software upgrade.

Now they tell us we must upgrade again to be able to run their applications on Vista. Where are the tree huggers when it comes to obsoleting our hardware before it dies. I have about 7-8 boxes with 98 on them I can't use.
Are they going to wind up in a landfill in the name of progress? Kids wouldn't even want them. We seem to be in such a hurry to improve. I like Windows 2000 and XP and see no reason to change? Yet, the market seems dominated and forceful to change, whether it is needed or not.

What is the real reason to have Vista?

Why do we have to use Vista?

What was so bad with XP that we just can't have an XP second edition (all patches preloaded)?

The answer is $.
Microsoft needs new capital, publishers need new books to market, etc.. etc...
Work Smarter Not Harder
Eino V
Honored Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Ken

Yes, that is it how it goes. Always must be something new to sell and it must look better than the old one or it is impossible to be sold.

Then also after some year the support ends and you can not get a new devices to work, if you must buy a new, when the old one has gone broken.

Eino
Hugo Tigre
Trusted Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

I agree with what you guys are saying, but in this case, i don't think that's the main problem, although the lack of support for previous versions is a problem indeed (i think it depends on the amount of time Microsoft keeps support for the previous version).

Because, since XP a lot of new software tecnologies have evolved, like virtualization, rootkits, etc..

And Vista was suppose to change the core of windows, change how the registry works, etc, and this way, provide better security and efficiency.

Desktop replication was supposed to evolve a lot too, for example, users had the option to get windows version in image format from the start, enabling replication to be a lot easier, and finally filling RIS gaps and limitation.

Anyway this was only some of the new important features that vista was bringing.

But since it's release, the evil inside this new windows is too much to be ignore.

hugo
Jon Finley
Honored Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

I have to laugh. You all sound as bad as my mother. :-)

I don't want to learn something new. Why can't I stay with what I know?

Now... don't get me wrong... I don't agree with anything that is going to restrict us in the use of our property, or handicap what is supposted to be a useful tool, but Vista will be main stream way sooner than you think.

Dell, HP/Compaq, Gateway, Toshiba (just to name a few players) are all pushing the product. The Kids will bring in into the local Universities before the Staff and Faculty will.

We've been testing Vista and working with our vendors at my University since the November release, in preparation of Vista hitting the campus by mid to late February.

The Corporate environment is hot after Bitlocker and other forms of encryption to safeguard their mobile force (think of all the missing laptops with valuable inside information, that will no longer be accessable).

From a Security stand-point alone, the reduction in attack surface simply by NOT elevating even local Administrators, until the application or process needs the elevated token, is a welcome change.

Brave new world. We may go into it kicking and screaming, but it's coming. :-)

Jon
"Do or do not. There is no try!" - Yoda
John Collier
Esteemed Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Interesting thread.

First off, as badly as I don't want to, I have to say that it is high time that the Forum creates a new category for Vista. Like it or not, it is coming and it needs it's own space here just as XP did.

Personally, I see the argument on both sides of this. The 'kids' (nice wording, but the way) will always want the latest and greatest of anything even if it is not in their best interest. A University, therefore, will be required to deal with it prior to many other businesses. Therefore, it is wise that the testing has begun and the pieces are being put in place for it already.

The regular home user will be forced into it slowly, but surely as the machines they currently own (designed by the factory to be obsolete and/or break in 18 months) start to fail and the retail sharks convince them that it would be 'cheaper & easier' to buy a new one rather than fix their old one.

Like it or not, agree with what they are doing or not, resist it or not, it IS coming and we will not stop it.

Get ready!

Now, I saw a reply to this thread (man, these things STILL need to show the entire thread in this reply window so we can reference it as we respond!) relating to the business that just retired it's last Win 98 machine due to incompatibility, not hardware failure. The same reply mentioned that they would like to try Linux, but couldn't afford to start over from scratch. Here's a thought: Why not use the old machines you just retired and load Linux on them to use as your 'sandboxes'?

If you want to keep with the entire business type distros for this, then try out the Fedora Linux ( http://fedora.redhat.com ) which is the free version of Red Hat. It can help prepare you for the Commercial version if you ever choose to make the conversion at the office.

Of course, there are other Enterprise Linux versions out there as well each, usually, with their own free distro as well. I mention Fedora simply because it is my personal favorite. {grin}

We have moved all of our home computers to Fedora Core 6 and I have no intention of installing any Microsoft products on any of our computers ever again. Even my wife, a hard core, Microsoft user for years, has decided that she like FC6. Installation was a breeze (it found all of our hardware including the USB attached printer) and I had to do little to make most things work. The community support is incredible as well. ( http://www.fedoraforum.org just to name one)

Of course, that is not what this thread is all about.

I don't see any reason why all the business people would want to or need to change over to Vista. Sure, there might be a security issue here or there that looks better on the surface, but if experience has proven anything to us it has taught us that the Boys and Girls in Redmond aren't to be trusted with a new release of ANYTHING. It is not worth the upgrade price in hardware or software in my opinion.

I said it once before, and I will repeat it now:

Like it or not, Vista is coming. Get ready....
"I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good, therefore, that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again." Stephen Krebbet, 1793-1855
Pablo Emilio Escobar
Occasional Visitor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

here is the famous rootkit software ,now for vista
author's homepage :- PJF''s BLOG
Http://www.blogcn.com/user17/pjf/index.html
for vista {english version} {will probably be a bit slow downloading}
Http://202.38.64.10/~jfpan/download/is120en_vista.zip
MD5: 815cdcf4d9561954772e78a0a30c0cfc
for xp {english version}
Http://202.38.64.10/~jfpan/download/IceSword120_en.zip
MD5: 14573e30abbbe576ed739ec7866e5939
excellent tutorial by Mahesh Satyanarayana (swatkat)
Http://www.castlecops.com/t165203-IceSword_Instructions_in_English_Illustrated.html


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Bolton, Wyoming - A new threat affecting Microsoft Windows Vista, the widely anticipated operating system already plagued by major bug issues and release delays, may seriously limit industry rollout, security analysts said today. The threat, an innovative, potentially devastating form of computer virus, has Microsoft and anti-virus corporations scrambling to develop protection, with consumers and businesses strongly advised to disable all systems running Microsoft Vista until a sanctioned antidote has been found.

The virus, code-named "Vista Dysentery.Net-Worm" is believed to be the first computer virus that is fully organic in nature. Because of this dramatic departure from traditional computer virus construction, the Vista Dysentery.Net-Worm virus cannot be targeted by standard anti-virus software.

"It's a quantum leap, if you will, in computer virus development, and probably the most dangerous new worm we've ever seen," Darryl Sickle, a security specialist with McAfee Associates, said. "This virus is a biological entity, rather than a sequence of computer code. That's a threat category we've never even considered, and at the moment Windows Vista users worldwide are completely defenseless."

According to Mr. Sickle and others who have studied the virus, Vista Dysentery.Net-Worm mimics, in some ways, the actions of the amoeba known as Entamoeba histolytica, which causes Amoebic Dysentery in humans.

"As such, virus is probably the wrong characterization," Mr. Sickle said. "This is more like a bacterial infection of your computer."

Based on studies conducted at the Early Warning Antivirus Center in Bolton, Wyoming, Vista Dysentery.Net-Worm is caused by an amoeba-like organic entity that is capable of transmitting itself at rates approaching the speed of light across fiber optic and copper network cables. The virus, which is believed to have been genetically engineered, carries a sophisticated sensory mechanism built into its DNA that allows it to pinpoint and target Windows Vista computers via magnetic resonance analysis of the hard drive stack.

Because the virus is not dependent on a machine being activated, it can target machines even when they are turned off. The only requirement is that the computer have at least one copy of Microsoft Windows Vista installed, and that it be physically connected to the internet or an infected LAN. As yet, the virus is not believed to be capable of transmitting itself across wireless networks.

Upon arriving at a suitable host machine, Vista Dysentery.Net-Worm begins replicating itself at the rate of roughly one division per microsecond. Within minutes, trillions of new, fully-activated viral entities are ready to be dispatched back out across the same broadband networks, where they immediately begin seeking out other vulnerable Microsoft Windows Vista hosts.

A subset of Vista Dysentery.Net-Worm "amoebas" remain on the host machine and rapidly consume the hard drive, flash and USB memory modules, RAM, and other sensitive internal components, excreting residue in the form of a gray, pulpy mass.

"Most users won't even know they've been infected until they notice that their computer is sitting in a pool of viscous gray sludge sludge that used to be their hard drives," Mr. Sickle said.

Grass roots remedies, such as applying aspirin or Vicks Vapo-Rub to the outer surface of the computer, Mr. Sickle said, are believed to be ineffective.

Until a working "antibody" for the Vista Dysentery.Net-Worm virus is developed, Mr. Sickle recommends all Windows Vista users immediately power down and physically isolate their computers, ideally, if weather conditions are suitable, by burying the computer in at least three feet of snow.

"We think cold weather can help slow the replication rate of the virus," Mr. Sickle said, "but that's only a stopgap measure. If your computer is infected, your only hope is a secure backup, because whatever's inside that box is going to be goo within no more than a few hours."
Hugo Tigre
Trusted Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

I have to say...lol

nice..
Jay Bollyn
Honored Contributor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Most large networks don't roll out a new desktop OS until SP1, so this decision is still in the testing phase for those networks.

On my network, we don't generally upgrade the OS of existing PCs. Only new PCs will get Vista. Vista needs a relatively new PC for satisfactory performance, anyway. That's the way it always is with a new desktop OS. And OS upgrades never run like a fresh install.

So I guess we can debate the value of this or that new feature, but for large networks, new features and a new interface are a major support and training issue.

So there won't be a significant percentage of Vista PCs on my network for at least one year.

J.
check Facebook
Percival
Advisor

Re: Lets talk Vista... c",)

Hello to all,

Just want everyone know that the reason why I did open this topic is that for sure a lot of us will be asking a lot questions about yhe said OS, so lets just talk about the problems that we could encounter and help each other fix it... isn't it a good idea???

thanks all;