New to Linux

 
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Felipe Rodriguez_1
Frequent Advisor

New to Linux

Hi! Sorry if this is long, I just want to be clear.

I want to install a reasonably popular version of Linux (if that makes any sense) on my PC as a dual boot system. Whatever version I choose needs to be as close as possible to what big businesses are, or will be using.

My objective is to become familiar with the OS and practice commands, shell scripting, etc. And eventually get a job that would put me in line for a System Administror's role.

I have looked around and have seen free and comercially available versions. The Red Hat Enterprise for example is around $179.

I don't want to spend that kind of money unless this is THE verion I should have. What are my options?
23 REPLIES 23
Derek Whigham_1
Trusted Contributor
Solution

Re: New to Linux

I am a fan of knoppix from www.knoppix.net

It is a Linux Live CD or DVD (700Mb/3.5Gb) and boot directly fromm the CD/DVD on your PC. It is fully functional with serious amounts of software included, It also support many wireless adapters.

Give it a go , I love it. and use it when I can.
Divide and Conquer
Ivan Ferreira
Honored Contributor

Re: New to Linux

Install Fedora Core 4. It's almost the same thing that RHEL.

You can also use CentOS, that is based on RHEL source.
Por que hacerlo dificil si es posible hacerlo facil? - Why do it the hard way, when you can do it the easy way?
Rick Garland
Honored Contributor

Re: New to Linux

My vote is Fedora. Fedora is a free download.

My opinion is that RedHat and SuSE are the 2 major players for production right now. This can change at any time.

If you can get another system, do so. Learning the OS and shell scripting is good but networking is a big part of the job as well. Could be the biggest part.
Felipe Rodriguez_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: New to Linux

Thanks to all.

Do you need to modify the bios to boot the OS from CD or deos it do an auto detect kind of thing?
I like the idea of booting from CD, but is that going to slow the operation?

Good idea about the networking stuff.

What are the differences, besides boot method, from Fedora and Knoppix?

Is Fedora going to be a pain to install as dual boot on my laptop? Can you point me to the download site(s)?

Rick Garland
Honored Contributor

Re: New to Linux

If you are set to boot from CD then no need to modify the BIOS. I velieve most PCs are set that way already, to boot from CD, then from floppy, the HD.

If making dual boot system, load winbloz 1st. This will take take care of the Master Boot Record (MBR) then you can load the Linux after that.

If you are motivated, look at Crossover Office, Wine, or VMWare. This will aloow you to run the multiple OSs simultaneously as opposed to one at a time with a dual boot methodology.

Derek Whigham_1
Trusted Contributor

Re: New to Linux

You will have to tell the system to boot from CD first in the BIOS, The performance is not bad at all, If you are using knoppix type "knoppix dma" when booting, If you have some free disk space you can create a permanent config/swap space filesystem. Which helps the performance
Divide and Conquer
Felipe Rodriguez_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: New to Linux

Rick, assuming all three tools are reliable; which has the best cost-to-function ratio? Remember I'm a newbie here :-).

What is "winbloz" and how doea it work?
Felipe Rodriguez_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: New to Linux

Derek, where do I get Knoppix and how much is it?
Rick Garland
Honored Contributor

Re: New to Linux

winbloz is UNIX-speak for windows. In these UNIX forums you will find alot of us UNIX-bigots.

Crossover and Wine are relatively cheap ($39 I believe) and they allow you you run a windows application, or multiple apps. You do not get the windows environment.

VMWare is some $200 but it allows you to run the entire windows environment and the apps that are with it - Virtual Machine. Load additional win apps (MSOffice, Intuit, Visio, etc) and you can run these apps in a windows environment.

Virtual Machine - like having 2 separate systems but you are actually working on 1 physical machine.