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Tar file size

Andrew Kaplan
Super Advisor

Tar file size

Hi there --

I am using a script that creates a tar file, subsequently encrypts the file, and then uses the dd command to copy to tape. The version of tar that is in use is GNU tar 1.19 release. The operating system is the HP-UX 11.11 distribution.

Correct me if I am wrong, but the two gigabyte limit for tar files is no longer a factor with version 1.15 and above of GNU tar. If it is still a factor, what version, if any, of GNU tar can create tar files greater than two gigabytes? Thanks.
A Journey In The Quest Of Knowledge
14 REPLIES
T G Manikandan
Honored Contributor

Re: Tar file size

Please check this patch please
PHCO_36587

http://www11.itrc.hp.com/service/patch/patchDetail.do?patchid=PHCO_36587&sel={hpux:11.11,}&BC=main|search|

looks like fixes files upto 8Gb
T G Manikandan
Honored Contributor

Re: Tar file size

Yes , GNU tar version 1.15 can support files > 2G
T G Manikandan
Honored Contributor

Re: Tar file size

Andrew Kaplan
Super Advisor

Re: Tar file size

Hi there --

Thanks for everyone's reply. I am running the script now, and I noticed that when I run the du -ks command on the encrypted tar file, the size of the file is at two gigabytes. This is the read out that I have been seeing for at least half an hour even though the time to create the file that eventually grew to that size was less than that.

I am concerned that the file is not breaking the two gigabyte size limit. Does anyone have any ideas on this?
A Journey In The Quest Of Knowledge
Michael Mike Reaser
Valued Contributor

Re: Tar file size

Allow me to ask the possibly stupid question of "Are you sure that the file system, on which the tar file is being created, is enabled for large files?"
There's no place like 127.0.0.1

HP-Server-Literate since 1979
Patrick Wallek
Honored Contributor

Re: Tar file size

Does the filesystem that you are writing this file to allow for files larger than 2GB?

Andrew Kaplan
Super Advisor

Re: Tar file size

Hi there --

I checked /etc/fstab file, and listed below is an excerpt which pertains to the filesystem in question:

/dev/vg109/lvol1 /scratch1 vxfs delaylog,datainlog,largefiles 0 0

However, when I go into SAM and check the attributes for the filesystem, the allow large files setting is no.

I am going to correct the discrepancy, and try again. Thanks for the help.

A Journey In The Quest Of Knowledge
James R. Ferguson
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Tar file size

Hi Andrew:

THe value for '(no)largefiles' in '/etc/fstab' are for mount time protection only. What matters is the underlying filesystem. Check it with:

# mkfs -m /dev/vgNN/lvolX

Regards!

...JRF...
Andrew Kaplan
Super Advisor

Re: Tar file size

Hi there --

The mkfs commmand confirmed the filesystem in question has the nolargefiles flag assigned to it.

One followup question: Can the filesystem be reconfigured to allow largefiles?

A Journey In The Quest Of Knowledge
Dennis Handly
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Tar file size


Yes:
fsadm -F vxfs -o largefiles /dev/vg109/lvol1
Andrew Kaplan
Super Advisor

Re: Tar file size

Just one bit of clarification on enabling largefiles...the filesystem is utilizing the full version of online vxfs. Can the change be made on the fly, or would it be better to unmount the logical volume, run the command, and then remount it? Thanks.
A Journey In The Quest Of Knowledge
James R. Ferguson
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Tar file size

Hi (again) Andrew:

Yes, with OnlineJFS you can enable largefiles for the filesystem without unmounting.

Regards!

...JRF...
Bill Hassell
Honored Contributor

Re: Tar file size

Standard tar can backup an unlimited number of files up to 2 GB each. The resultant tar archive (with all the files inside) can be terabytes in size. The limitation for tar refers to individual files that are included in the tar archive file. If the filesystem where the archive file is located does not support largefiles, then the archive will stop when it is larger than 2 GB. To see is you have largefiles enabled, use fsadm as in:

fsadm /var
fsadm: /etc/default/fs is used for determining the file system type
nolargefiles


Bill Hassell, sysadmin
Dennis Handly
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Tar file size

>Can the change be made on the fly

It can be done on the fly without OnlineJFS.

>JRF: Yes, with OnlineJFS you can enable largefiles for the filesystem without unmounting.

I've done fsadm without OnlineJFS, the last time someone made this statement.