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components

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Joe van Raamt
Super Advisor

components

Sorry, I posted this in wrong section:
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My daughter needs to know what to look for when buying a new pc. She uses it mostly for the book keeping of their business and not much else. So far I have suggested a 2 to 2.5 giga hz., 80 gig H.D., dual bios, windows XP professional edition, Cd-rewrite and dvd. Is there a lot of difference in quality of brand names or would she be better off to have one assembled? Does HP have dual bios? I have not seen it thus far.
c'est la guerre
8 REPLIES
lowster
Honored Contributor

Re: components




Refurbished desktop PCs


From $359.99*
As low as $20/moâ  

HP and Compaq PCs that perform like new

http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/generic_category.do?storeName=storefronts&landing=outlet_store&category=refurb_desktops&catLevel=1
Joe van Raamt
Super Advisor

Re: components

Thanks Chris, I will fwd the url to her.
It might be cheaper in the end to buy one in Canada, considering the shipping cost.
It there such a thing as a dual BIOS with HP?
I have one on a gigabyte KT 400 motherboard and was told that it works something like a back up.
c'est la guerre
SAKET_5
Honored Contributor

Re: components

Joe,

generally speaking, the idea of a redundant ROM is there to prevent you from a motherboard BIOS failure....so on majority of the new PCs & Servers (e.g. HP Proliants) basically its a logical partition on the ROM chip that can hold two seperate images of the BIOS. If you are carrying an upgrade of the BIOS and it goes south....then you can boot up your PC/Server, go into BIOS Selection menu and choose the original BIOS coming from a seperate partition of the ROM which was not impacted as a consequence of the failed BIOS upgrade, boot the system up...and you are fine.

Assuming, the PC is used for primitive stuff and the likelihood of upgrading BIOS is fairly low (am I right in saying this??) - I would not be too concerned about this....ofcourse if you get this feature embedded in a deal for no extra....I would not say NO...either!

My 2cents worth....

Enjoy:)
Joe van Raamt
Super Advisor

Re: components

One more question: Home versus profesional edition of Windows XP (what is the difference?)
c'est la guerre
Dexter Filmore
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: components

Here is a comparison between the two:

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/howtobuy/choosing2.mspx

Hope this is what you are after
Oguz Kutlu Asik
Honored Contributor

Re: components

I bought my pc several months ago, and it has a P4 2.8 GHz, and 120 GB SATA hard disk. I recommend you to have it with a hdd has a capacitiy of 250 GB or something, you can't imagine how fast it becomes full.

I don't think dual bios is much necessary, as you can boot with motherboard cd and restore bios if corrupted in up-to-date computers.

I also recommend having a dvd-rewriter, instead of cd-rewriter, which can burn CDs (600 MB) and DVDs (4.7 GB) also. I am using an LG one, and quite ok with it.

Difference between Home and Professional Edition is networking capabilities, as you can't join a HE to a domain etc. If you will use it only at home, PE is not necessary, although I never like/use HE.
What's right is right, whether or not God exists
Joe van Raamt
Super Advisor

Re: components

Thanks to all of you, my questions have been answered.
c'est la guerre
Joe van Raamt
Super Advisor

Re: components

thanks, my questions have been answered.
c'est la guerre