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diff b/w format modes

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Maaz
Valued Contributor

diff b/w format modes

I run gloppy and there is three formatting mode
1 Quick(only creates the filesystem)
2 Standard(adds a low-level format to the quick mode)
3 Thorough
Whats the 'low-level' format means? and when it should be use?
when I should choose 'Quick' mode ?
and when I should choose 'Standard' mode ?


Second, when I issue 'mke2fs /dev/fd0 ' or 'mkfs /dev/hda9' it didnt asks about Quick and Standard modes... why ???


Many Thanks
Maaz
4 REPLIES
Maaz
Valued Contributor

Re: diff b/w format modes

hello Gurus.... help please.

Maaz
Nicolas Dumeige
Esteemed Contributor

Re: diff b/w format modes

Low-level formatting creates the physical format that dictates where data is stored on the disk.
It should be use when you cannot use the standard method.
As for the usage, gloppy offers the same option as Windows would do !

The mke2fs command create the filesystem on a disk.

All different, all Unix
Maaz
Valued Contributor

Re: diff b/w format modes

please accept my appologies... infact me so dumb :(

Can anybody explain/elaborate a bit more ???

Regards
Maaz
Nicolas Dumeige
Esteemed Contributor
Solution

Re: diff b/w format modes

There are two steps involved in formatting magnetic media such as floppy disks and hard disks. The first step involves the creation of the actual structures on the surface of the media that are used to hold the data. This means recording the tracks and marking the start of each sector on each track. This is called low-level formatting, and sometimes is called "true formatting" since it is actually recording the format that will be used to store information on the disk.

The second formatting step is high-level formatting. This is the process of creating the disk's logical structures such as the file allocation table and root directory. The high-level format uses the structures created by the low-level format to prepare the disk to hold files using the chosen file system.

All different, all Unix