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more then 80 chars in a single line

Maaz
Valued Contributor

more then 80 chars in a single line

on command line environment(no GUI), if a line is consisting upon more then 80 characters its wrap and go to second line.

I want 100 characters on a single line.

please help
3 REPLIES
Steven Schweda
Honored Contributor

Re: more then 80 chars in a single line

> on command line environment(no GUI), [...]

Not a useful description. Are you talking
about an xterm, or some other terminal
emulator, or a real VT100, or what?

> I want 100 characters on a single line.

Use a wider terminal emulator window?
Dennis Handly
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: more then 80 chars in a single line

>I want 100 characters on a single line.

Do you have lots of space after the 80 chars? Have you exported COLUMNS?
Do you have a long PS1 prompt?

>Steven: Use a wider terminal emulator window?

And/or smaller fonts?
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor

Re: more then 80 chars in a single line

Hmm... a command line environment, but no mention of remote access of any sort. Perhaps this is about the text mode on the Linux system console?

In that case, there are two possibilities depending on the Linux distribution used:

1.) Most Linux distributions today will use the VESA frame-buffer mode. This allows the use of some graphics without the X server, e.g. graphic start-up splash screens. In this case, you must first set the desired video mode at system boot time using the video= kernel parameter, and then run "eval $(resize)" to make the shell and the tty driver aware of the non-default screen size.
Some framebuffer drivers may allow changing the video mode with the "fbset" command.

For more information:
http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Framebuffer-HOWTO.html (rather old, but still useful)

http://www.mjmwired.net/kernel/Documentation/fb/vesafb.txt (up-to-date kernel documentation)

2.) Some distributions (especially with stripped-down server configurations) might still use the default 80x25 VGA text mode with no framebuffer support. In this case, the display size must be changed at boot time, using the vga= kernel parameter. You can set "vga=ask" to make the kernel display a menu of available display modes at system boot: after you've chosen a mode that is suitable for you, replace the "ask" keyword with the number corresponding to that mode.

MK
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