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system log file

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allan_47
Occasional Contributor

system log file

I have a 10.20 unix. My system suddenly shuts down. The last I have was an email that my cpu idle is 0% and have low memory too. Is it possible that my system will crash?Where can I find some useful system log files. I tried to view /etc/shutdownlog, but it only prompts some errors ex. "Reboot after panic: , isr.ior = 0'10240085.40000000'fedc4a5c"
does anybody know what this means

I even tried to view on syslog.log
and I have sample errors below stating that
"btlan1: Initializing 10/100BASE-T card at 10/16/16.......
Networking memory for fragment reassembly is restricted to 204800 bytes
Logical volume 64, 0x3 configured as ROOT
Logical volume 64, 0x2 configured as SWAP
Logical volume 64, 0x2 configured as DUMP
Swap device table: (start & size given in 512-byte blocks)
entry 0 - major is 64, minor is 0x2; start = 0, size = 2097152
WARNING: Insufficient space on dump device to save full crashdump.
Only 1073741824 of 2684355584 bytes will be saved.
Dump device table: (start & size given in 1-Kbyte blocks)
entry 0 - major is 31, minor is 0x46000; start = 207712, size = 1048576
netisr real-time priority reset to 100
Starting the STREAMS daemons.
9245XB HP-UX (B.10.20) #1: Sun Jun 9 06:31:19 PDT 1996"

thanks
5 REPLIES
Steven E. Protter
Exalted Contributor
Solution

Re: system log file

cd /var/adm/crash

after the failure.

See if there is a subdirectory. There probably is. Clear old crash dumps, make sure there is room for a new one.

If yes, check the date and do a q4 crash dump analysis on it.

If there is no crash, change the first variable in /etc/rc.config.d/savecrash to 1, Restart the system, wait for the next crash.

If its a traditional crash, you'll get data to run q4 analysis on.

If your system has GSP, log on during a frozen condition and do a TC, which is really a TOC Tranfer of Control. That will do a crash dump.

After analyzing any crash dump, send it to the response center. They will analyze it, tell you what is wrong and give you instructions on how to fix it.

Also, check /var/adm/syslog/syslog.log and dmesg output for hardware problems.

SEP
Steven E Protter
Owner of ISN Corporation
http://isnamerica.com
http://hpuxconsulting.com
Sponsor: http://hpux.ws
Twitter: http://twitter.com/hpuxlinux
Founder http://newdatacloud.com
Isralyn Manalac_1
Regular Advisor

Re: system log file

Other files to check (in addition to what Steven has mentioned) are:

- /etc/shutdownlog (if you have a support contract with HP, you might want to include this in the list of files to send)
- /var/adm/tombstones (check for ts* files with the same timestamp as when the crash occurred)
- /var/adm/syslog/OLDsyslog.log (check the last entries of the log file)

Please note that the warning message as indicated in your post suggests that there was insufficient disk space on your dump device to save a full crashdump.

Regards,

Ira
Yogeeraj_1
Honored Contributor

Re: system log file

hi,

Have a look at your OLDsyslog.log.

you should also check your GSP console.

regards
yogeeraj
No person was ever honoured for what he received. Honour has been the reward for what he gave (clavin coolidge)
Henk Geurts
Esteemed Contributor

Re: system log file

hi Allen
on the GSP (console)


SL (: Show Logs (chassis code buffer)
Select Chassis Code Buffer to be displayed:
Incoming, Activity, Error, Current boot or Last boot? (I/A/E/C/L) E

check the entries .

regards
Henk
Jim Butler
Valued Contributor

Re: system log file

try logging what is happening to a log


sar -d 5 30

sar -u 5 30

swapinfo -tam

This can and will tell you something of the performance (place in a loop, and run continuously, then review after the reboot to get a clue as to what is going on.
Man The Bilge Pumps!