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L2000 Server Age

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L2000 Server Age

I have a couple of L2000 servers that pre-date my time at this company and were inherited during a series of mergers and buyouts.

I've been tasked to come up with a long term hardware strategy and want to know if there is an easy way to determine the age of those servers. They are both running HP UX 11.0
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Pete Randall
Outstanding Contributor

Re: L2000 Server Age

Tim Nelson
Honored Contributor

Re: L2000 Server Age

Depending on the CPU speed. If 400MHZ then I would guess around 1999/2000. If 750MHZ then maybe 2002ish..

Running 11.0, well that version is now unsupported so do with that what you will.

If the equipment still does what you need it to do then it is worth something to everyone.
If you can bear with the increases in maintenance costs due to the age then perhaps there is no issue ?

If someone is looking for the latest and greatest model then you are at or around 8-10 years old on this equipment.

A long term hardware strategy today will be obsolete by tomorrow ;)

My past experiences and input may be this:
How does the company wish to refresh their technology ? If they feel that they would have a competative advantage by using the latest and greatest technogy then a refresh of hardware every year or two maybe the philosolphy.

Now, can the business afford that ? maybe, maybe not. Does having a x.xx GHZ processor and the latest disk vs last years model really increase productivity and advantage by x% at a cost of xx% ?

In my last life we refreshed technology every 3 years and extended the investment in the old technolgy to the non-production/test environments.

Sometimes purchasing new smaller less expensice equipment with a warranty and uplift could wash the costs of maintenace on the old equipment.

On to the next topic, how does the company depreciate the costs ? 3 years, 5 years, getting rid of equipment that is not yet off the books may be an accounting issue..

and on...
Torsten.
Acclaimed Contributor
Solution

Re: L2000 Server Age

It's coded into the serial number.

Hope this helps!
Regards
Torsten.

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Re: L2000 Server Age

Both of these servers host DB applications that support a manufacturing process. Neither is working very hard.

I think my biggest concern, and this is simply a gut reaction, is paying hardware support in excess of $30k/year on two servers that could easily be converted to Linux/VM. The only real concern would be preserving disk I/O the savings alone would support solutions to do that.

Furthermore, there is no business continuity plan for these servers, so in the event of a computer room fire, for example, we are going to be hard pressed to come up with similar hardware on short notice.

So, and again this my gut reaction, swapping them out to a linux/VM platform looks pretty attractive compared to nursing a 7-9 year old servers.

Re: L2000 Server Age

Torsten, I remembered that from somewhere, but how do I decode it?
Torsten.
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: L2000 Server Age

I don't have access to my records right now, but IIRC it is like this for your server:

ABCYWW...

ABC is factory location
Y year
WW week

But there are many different codes for many different products.


Servers from the german factory have numbers like

DEH...

DE = Deutschland
H = Herrenberg

http://maps.google.de/maps?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4ADBR_enUS282DE282&q=herrenberg&um=1&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&resnum=1&ct=title

Hope this helps!
Regards
Torsten.

__________________________________________________
There are only 10 types of people in the world -
those who understand binary, and those who don't.

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Tim Nelson
Honored Contributor

Re: L2000 Server Age

I would conclude that if the workload is low and a Intel/Linux/VM solution is supportable then the long run lower cost solution would be to replace.

Add up the up front costs:
Intel server and licensing $xxxx
Enterprise Linux licensing $xxxx
VMWare licensing $xxxx
New application licensing $xxxx
New application development/porting $xxxx

Add up the reoccuring and multiply by 3 years.
Annual HW/SW support costs $xxxx X 3

Average annual HW support cost of a 4 CPU L2000 around $10,000ea X 3 years.


Then compare.....

Re: L2000 Server Age

Here's the serial/date code as I remember it...

First three digits are location, next 2 +60 = year of manufacture and then the next two after that are week of the year it was manufactured.

So for my newer L2000, this works perfectly.

USS4132XXX - 2001 week 32

But for my older server

USS3003XXX - 1990 week 3? Obviously it's different here.

I'm pretty sure 3003 was built in January of 2000 and 4132 was built in late July or early August of 2001.