HPE 9000 and HPE e3000 Servers
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

HP 9000 Superdome heat dissipation

 
Joseph P. McCauley
Occasional Visitor

HP 9000 Superdome heat dissipation

We will be getting two HP 9000 Superdome 64-way units soon, and we would like to make sure our data center facility is up to snuff. I found the electrical requirements, but I want to make sure our data center has appropriate air conditioning. I cannot find the information on the maximum heat dissipation. Can anyone help me with this?

We may also be getting an xp1024 Disk Array. Anyone have the heat disipation on this unit?

Thanks,
Joe McCauley
4 REPLIES 4
Bernhard Mueller
Honored Contributor

Re: HP 9000 Superdome heat dissipation

Joe,

this should be in the "Superdome Site Preparation Guide" A5201-10024

on http://docs.hp.com

see attachment

Regards,
Bernhard

Joseph P. McCauley
Occasional Visitor

Re: HP 9000 Superdome heat dissipation

Thank you very much
A. Clay Stephenson
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: HP 9000 Superdome heat dissipation

Well, let me put my physicist hat on:

You have to realize that for all practical purposes (and to greater than 99.9% accuracy) computers are nother but heaters -- expensive heaters but heaters nonetheless.
This means that if you have the input power, you have the output head dissipation --- they are one in the same.


To approximate power dissipation, you can multiply rated input voltage by rated current to get Volt-Amps. Then multiply by a power factor (usually about 0.8 to get watts - remember this is AC 1VA is usually not 1WA because we have those pesky phase angles) If you want to be very conservative, use a pf of 1.0 and some HP computers run a pf of 0.99. If you use a power factor of 1.0 then you will always be safe. The one other formula I should throw at you is how to calculate 3-phase power. It's simply P = IV * 3 ^ 0.5 * pf where P = power in watts, I = current in Amperes, V = Voltage, 3 ^ 0.5 ==> square root of 3 (or the appropriate number of phases), and pf = power factor (again somewhere between 0.8 and 1.0). Power factor is actually the cosine of the between the phase angle of the current and voltage.

Example :

Suppose the power supply label indicates 10 A at 200V; what is the thermal dissipation?

10A x 200V = 2000VA x 0.8 (pf) = 1600W.

1600W x 3.412 BTU/HR-W = 5460 BTU/HR.

The other conversion factor you need to know is that 12000 BTU/hr = 1Ton Cooling Capacity


Regards, Clay
If it ain't broke, I can fix that.
Sorrel G. Jakins
Valued Contributor

Re: HP 9000 Superdome heat dissipation

But my electrician told me that kVA and kW are the same thing!