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HP9000 K class

 
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Mike Cravens
Occasional Visitor

HP9000 K class

I have a production KClass with about 300 users. When logging on lately, it makes quick response prompting for username and password, however as soon as they hit enter on the password entry it immediately says connection lost. It takes multiple attempts (one as high as 16 consecutive tries), and it will finally let the user in. Not all users have this problem and sometimes it's not there at all. I'm looking for ideas and if anyone can clue me in as the stages of the login process that would help as well. The quickness of the response combined with the lost connection suggests to me that there is a 'front end' handling the login prompts and then that info is passed on to something else whereupon it fails. Thanks
7 REPLIES 7
DCE
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: HP9000 K class


couple of suggestions
run the dmesg command to see if there are any recent messages

run glance and look at the process tables (press t at the main screen)

I would look at the nproc parameter, specifically, because it will produce the described system when maxed out.

Look at the syslog for error messages.

Another possible cause is DNS.
verify the nsswitch is configured correctly, /etc/hosts is correct, and the forward and revese lookup work correctly
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor

Re: HP9000 K class

"Connection lost" suggests you are using some sort of network connections... so which network login method are you using? Telnet? SSH? Something else?

The login process with "telnet" is as follows:
- client connects to TCP port 23
- inetd opens a socket, starts telnetd to handle the connection
- telnetd displays the "login:" prompt and receives the username from the client
- telnetd starts "login" and gives the username as a parameter to it
- "login" displays the "Password:" prompt, receives the password from the client and sends it to the PAM libraries for verification
- if the PAM libraries say the password is correct, login takes up the user's identity and starts the user's shell.
- the user's shell will execute the system-wide and individual login scripts, if they exist. Different shells will use different login script names.

You might be hitting system-wide kernel resource limits, e.g. nproc or nfile limit or simply running critically out of memory. If there is no space to start a new process, the login process will be aborted immediately.

As DCE suggested, run "dmesg" to see if there are any kernel messages that might explain the situation. If there are any messages like ": table is full" or "cannot fork", some system resource is completely maxed out.

MK
MK
Mike Cravens
Occasional Visitor

Re: HP9000 K class

Thanks to you both so far, we'll do these things asap. I did the dmesg already and got a lot of the same problem (different pids of course although there were a couple repeat pids), not sure what they mean.

A gui based telnet access is all we do all our PC's are on XPPro .

result of dmesg:
pid # got a bus error due to lack of alias pidir entries (69 of them today)
Mike Cravens
Occasional Visitor

Re: HP9000 K class

well we hit some snags, maybe you can add more. First of all we're on hpux 10.2 so no glance. Neither one of us knows how to view the syslog, nor how to look at nproc or nfile limits.

The pid msg I sent must be old since current pid's for active users today are of a completely different range of numbers.

If you could provide commands to view the syslog andhow to handle nproc or nfile we'd be greatful .

Patrick Wallek
Honored Contributor

Re: HP9000 K class

The syslog is just a text file and is located in /var/adm/syslog/syslog.log. You can use vi to look at it, or 'tail', or 'more'.

To check nproc and nfile you can use sar.

# sar -v 5 5
(sar -v -- will run qty 5 iterations with 5 seconds between each. You can adjust these numbers).

You will get some output like:
# sar -v 5 2

HP-UX hquas08 B.11.00 U 9000/800 06/05/07

11:31:50 text-sz ov proc-sz ov inod-sz ov file-sz ov
11:31:55 N/A N/A 118/276 0 476/476 0 585/920 0
11:32:00 N/A N/A 118/276 0 476/476 0 585/920 0

The proc-sz column is your nproc usage. The 118/276 means that you have 118 processes out of a maximum of 276.

The file-sz column is your nfile usage. The 585/920 means that there are 585 files open and you can go up to 920 open.
Patrick Wallek
Honored Contributor

Re: HP9000 K class

dmesg is really not the best place to check for errors. What you see from dmesg output could be 5 minutes old or 5 days old. There is no easy way to tell. Looking at syslog.log is much better since all entries have a date/time stamp.

For my 'sar' commands above, if you require more information have a look at 'man sar' (the sar man page).

By the way, not that this helps you any, glance was available for HP-UX 10.20, but it was, and still is, a product you have to purchase separately.
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Mike Cravens
Occasional Visitor

Re: HP9000 K class

Thank you all, we've got a hardware tech in today if he doesn't resolve it I'll be doing your instructions in the AM. We've got a company that is supposed to support OS and problems but has been unresponsive simply stating 'the system is not stressed' so I wanted to get some 'pro' advice to shove at them. Thanks very much.