HPE 9000 and HPE e3000 Servers
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How warm is it in there?

 
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Marty Metras
Super Advisor

How warm is it in there?

I got a message the other day when the A/C failed.
"The current temperature in the enclosure is 37 C degrees."
We have fixed the problem but I was wondering if there is a way I could read this temperature of the system?
Do one of you know how to do this?
Are there other sencors that I could read? Maybe UPS voltage?

This server is an HP-9000 rp2450 I also have an rp7400.
Just worndering?
Marty
The only thing that always remain the same are the changes.
4 REPLIES 4
Peter Godron
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: How warm is it in there?

Pupil_1
Trusted Contributor

Re: How warm is it in there?

from the GSP you should get the Power monitor status with the 'PS' command.

The other way of automatically getting alerts is to use EMS.
There is always something new to learn everyday !!
Marty Metras
Super Advisor

Re: How warm is it in there?

EMS trigger the message in the first place.
I was just worndering where it was reading the temerture from. Is being stored in the system some where where I could see it?
Same with Voltage?
Marty
The only thing that always remain the same are the changes.
Bill Hassell
Honored Contributor

Re: How warm is it in there?

There is no temperature gauge (or voltmeter) in HP-UX boxes. There are two temperature thresholds: warning and failure. When the temperature exceeds the failure level, the power is shutoff immediately (no graceful shutdown). If the voltage is too low, the same thing happens.

That's the simple explanation. The real question is: how much damage was done to the disks, tape drives, CDROM drives, network equipment, printers, etc when this disaster occurred? Air conditioning is the MOST overlooked safety item in small data centers yet the equipment it is desigtned to protect may be 10x to 100x more expensive than than the coolers.

Air conditioning for your data center must be on a UPS, and must have sensors to detect icing, compressor failure, water on the computer room floor, and all of these sensors must trigger an alarm to your 24x7 security center so someone can take immediate action. A data center can rise to 150 degs F. (65 deg C.) in just a few minutes after the fans stop running. The new HP servers will shutdown but the rest of your equipment will be boat anchors by the time you read your email or your pager.


Bill Hassell, sysadmin