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Viewing startup from console port

 
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Tor-Arne Nostdal
Trusted Contributor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

What you can do with 0-modem cable
(a bit off topic for this forum perhaps ;)

It could be that the handshaking or loss of carrier, is what terminate your session from the router to the console port...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_modem

By using the simplified null modem cable, you can fake this kind of control mechanisms on each side by strapping pins together, and only let the needed pins go between the two boxes (it must be +10yrs since I played with this...)

This is why I think you can solve it with "hardware"/cable - but I still would believe that Cisco should be able to tell if there is a configuration workaround for it...

/2r
I'm trying to become President of the state I'm in...
Tor-Arne Nostdal
Trusted Contributor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

Sorry for many postings ;)

I had to refresh memory by actually reading the Wikipedia article (No hardware handshaking)

So - what you need is pin 2,3 and 7 between the boxes. pin 2 towards 3 on opposite side, and 7 straight through.

This will simply pass communication without checking ... so what you loose - you loose...

To fake any kind of handshaking/checking made by the box, we used to strap (link together) pin 4,6,8,(20) so that the box always received signals who said "c'mon I'm ready to receive more data" when checking for a device connected and ready.

... software handshaking can be made though... if the software uses XON/XOFF... but that's another story...

Best regards
2r
I'm trying to become President of the state I'm in...
Brian_Foulks
Occasional Advisor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

Sorry for not getting back sooner. Fires to be put out...literally.

We tried the modified pinouts suggested to no effect. We remote into the server and see the MP login prompt. From another session into the box, we do a shutdown -r. In the remote window, we can see the shutdown process. Then we get a message:
system shutdown time has arrived
logout
there are running jobs.

[Connection to server closed by foreign host]

We are then not allowed to remote access into the box until startup is complete. How do we stop the server from disconnecting the remote access?

Thank you,

Brian
Tor-Arne Nostdal
Trusted Contributor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

After you have connected to the console and get the MP prompt try the following:

MP> CM
MP:CM> WHO

Are you connected via a Telnet session?
I'm trying to become President of the state I'm in...
cnb
Honored Contributor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

Brian,

"We tried the modified pinouts suggested to no effect. We remote into the server and see the MP login prompt. From another session into the box, we do a shutdown -r."

Connect your Cisco to the MP and telnet into it. At the MP prompt login and issue CO, at this point you're on the Live Console. You can only monitor startup/shutdown/reboot from the MP in order to see it. Any other port won't show you real-time console system start up messages.

iLO info:
http://www.docs.hp.com/en/5991-6006/index.html

rp3440 Service Guide indicates:

http://docs.hp.com/en/A7137-96008-ed5/A7137-96008-ed5.pdf

"You should log in to the iLO MP for the server and use the Console menu to access the system
console. Accessing the console through the iLO MP enables you to maintain console access to the
server after HP-UX has shut down."

The MP will never drop connection due to the OS shutting down. It is independent of the OS.

You can monitor shutdown from any port that issued the shutdown command but to monitor BOTH system start-up and shutdown you need to use the MP Console.

Based on the CISCO cabling issues stated, I may have misunderstood what you're actually trying to do so if I've missed the point of this thread...apologies to all.

HTH

Rgds,

Tor-Arne Nostdal
Trusted Contributor
Solution

Re: Viewing startup from console port

I have assumed that there have been a communication drop between the Cisco and the Server - this is why I mentioned pin-outs aso.

Are you sure you really looses connection?

If you have connected to the console port correctly you should be able to login and get the MP prompt.

Then you might login to the server by:
MP> CO
You perform a reboot, you see the shutdown process... and get the drop?

I assume you simply could use Ctrl+B to get back to the CM> prompt or what ?

In this case, you do not actually loose the connection between the Cisco and the server(GSP).

Swapping back and forth between MP> and Live console can be made with
MP> CO
{live console}
Ctrl+B


However - if you really looses the connection - it does not sound as your connected to the separate internally built MP (Managment Processor), but through a terminal session handled by the running server. When you shut down the server, you simply cut off the branch your sitting on.

/Tor-Arne
I'm trying to become President of the state I'm in...
Brian_Foulks
Occasional Advisor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

@Tor-Arne: We never logged into the MP. We just left it at the prompt. From another window, we did the shutdown. Based on what you and cnb are saying, it appears that we needed to log into the MP and then the console. We will be doing that tonight.

@cnb: We will try that. Thanks for the links. I had problems trying to determine the state we needed to be in to continue. We figure that as long as we had opened the link to the port, it would stay up, similar to routers and such.

Brian
Tor-Arne Nostdal
Trusted Contributor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

;) well seems your on the right track now anyway :D

Yes - you sure has to be logged into the MP>

When you get in there, you can type HE to get Help

Q and Ctrl+B is used to quit or get back one level.

You might fancy commands like:
VFP - Virtual Front Panel, to see the led lights on the server
CL - Console Log (probably what you expected out to your Cisco)

Remember to not leave the CO login session open when you do Ctrl+B

Have fun

/Tor-Arne
I'm trying to become President of the state I'm in...
Bill Hassell
Honored Contributor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

> We never logged into the MP. We just left it at the prompt. From another window, we did the shutdown.

That is the problem. The "console" is the MP port. Technically, it is another computer that manages the hardware but can connect to the real console. "From another window" probably means that you used telnet to talk to HP-UX, not the console. You need to stay on the real console (the MP port). Connect to the MP port, then type CTRL-B to get a login prompt to the MP. Then type CO to access the real console.

Now you can issue the shutdown -ry 0 command. When you see the end of the shutdown, type CTRL-B to return to the MP prompt and then type: vfp

That will allow you to watch the selftest sequences. When the message CELL HAS JOINED shows up, type CTRL-B to return to the main menu, then CO to connect to the console. You will then see the entire boot process.

You can skip the vfp step and just stay connected to console. However, there will be a period of a few minutes with nothing on the screen, then the boot process will start.


Bill Hassell, sysadmin
Tor-Arne Nostdal
Trusted Contributor

Re: Viewing startup from console port

However - to access the MP, you must sign in with username/password (LDAP is also possible).

If you simply want to limit the use to some extent, there is a possibility to define the user as Operator.

It is of utmost importance to secure a console port properly!!
If you allow LAN access, and use telnet to the MP, you should create very strict policies for which clients should be allowed access (and from where).
Newer MP's have SSL capability, though you might need to license this.
Some support https and that is better than using telnet.

There is some help functionality (command HE), but I recommend that manuals are read as this is a to important area to take lightly on.

/Tor-Arne
I'm trying to become President of the state I'm in...