HPE 9000 and HPE e3000 Servers
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

determine age of D-Class server

 
SOLVED
Go to solution
Guy Humphreys
Valued Contributor

determine age of D-Class server

dear all,

is there any way to discover how old a HP9000 server is? I have a D350 box that my client would like to know the age of - they have lost the original paperwork.

I have looked all over the physical box itself and can find no hint. I was just wondering if somewhere in cstm there is this info.

thanks for any help with this somewhat odd request

cheers
Guy
'If it ain't broke, don't fix it!'
7 REPLIES 7
Jaime Bolanos Rojas.
Honored Contributor

Re: determine age of D-Class server

Guy, the easiest way...

I would call hp hardware tech support, give them the serial number for the server, and they should be able to tell you when the warranty started on that machine, and that's pretty much -give or take a couple of month - the age of that machine.

Regards,

jaime.
Work hard when the need comes out.
Steven E. Protter
Exalted Contributor

Re: determine age of D-Class server

Shalom Guy,

There should be a metal stamp on the system.

You can get a rough idea by history. That system hit the market between 1994 or 1995 and was hard to obtain in the late 1990's.

I have a D320 that was built in 1996 and a D380 that was built in 1998 or 199. Why I have these expensive paper weights is at this moment beyond me. I used to practice HP-UX skills on them.

There is a serial number on the system board that you might be able to pull of with cstm. Then you might be able to get a more accurate picture from HP.

SEP
Steven E Protter
Owner of ISN Corporation
http://isnamerica.com
http://hpuxconsulting.com
Sponsor: http://hpux.ws
Twitter: http://twitter.com/hpuxlinux
Founder http://newdatacloud.com
Torsten.
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: determine age of D-Class server

This is stated in the serial number (Code).
Maybe this page will tell you the age:

http://www1.itrc.hp.com/service/ewarranty/warrantyInput.do

Hope this helps!
Regards
Torsten.

__________________________________________________
There are only 10 types of people in the world -
those who understand binary, and those who don't.

__________________________________________________
No support by private messages. Please ask the forum!

If you feel this was helpful please click the KUDOS! thumb below!   
TwoProc
Honored Contributor

Re: determine age of D-Class server

Guy, if that thing still have HPUX 10.20 on it, then it is probably the original OS.

If so, you can run "print_manifest" and it will tell you the date that the system was "created" (OS installed actually).

If you don't still have 10.20 on it, as a comparison point - I have some DL380s and 390s purchased in the 1997 timeframe.
We are the people our parents warned us about --Jimmy Buffett
A. Clay Stephenson
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: determine age of D-Class server

1) Method 1) - (accurate but a bit destructive). Slice open the CPU and count the rings.

2) Method 2) - (less destructive but less accurate). Knock a tiny chip d the CPU and send it out for C14 dating.

3) Method 3) - (close enough for our purposes) : You D-box is 1 decade old.
If it ain't broke, I can fix that.
Jesse Dougherty
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: determine age of D-Class server

Guy, the formula for determining the manufacture date via the HP system serial number is as follows:

Add 60 to the first two numbers of the serial number, this is the year of manufacture. The second two numbers of the
serial number are the week of manufacture. I have made an example of 2 systems that we have here.

K460 sn# 3741A45525 = 97 (1997) the 41st week of the year
D390-2 way sn# 3930A89201 = 99 (1999) the 30th week of the year

Hope this helps

Jesse
Cypress Technology Inc
Re-sellers of HP 3000/9000 Products
727-557-0911
jesse@cypress-tech.com
Guy Humphreys
Valued Contributor

Re: determine age of D-Class server

Jesse, thank you very much for your answer it has helped immensely. A HP engineer did tell me this formula many moons ago but I have since forgotten it - doh!

Clay, you get points for humour content and also being correct. The manufacture year was indeed 1996 so a decade was (coincidentally) spot on

cheers for all the other suggestions as well
Guy
'If it ain't broke, don't fix it!'