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leakin heatpipes...

 
rc_5
Occasional Advisor

leakin heatpipes...

I suspected a heat problem with my laptop puter.... had a small sink over the processor and a (heat pipe) to a small radiator....
The processor gets piping HOT and the pipe and radiator not so... suspecting what has been discussed I opened the radiator end to find a dry pipe... with a fine capilary mesh around the inside of the pipe!! In addition just to see if I could fix the animal with some jerry rigging I filled the tube with oil and soldered it shut and reinstalled it and tested it with a burn it program it didnt work... However after the test I found a leak at the processor end of the pipe thus thats where the special heat transfer ingredient went (evaporated) I guess! I guess a heat sink on a laptop can go bad after all!! What do you think gang!!! This was a HP ZT-1000!
5 REPLIES 5
Iain Ashley
Trusted Contributor

Re: leakin heatpipes...

The heatpipes that Chris described in the other thread for the K-class, are actually filled with a metallic fluid, probably a metal in oil suspension. I don't know what happened to the fluid in yours, is there no residue? It sounds like the main block is cracked also, I suspect that there's not much you can do.
rc_5
Occasional Advisor

Re: leakin heatpipes...

I think it had a commercial chiller R-12 referigerant or the like. Liquid at room temprature wierd stuff. It appears like oil. Any coolant would would work so long as at its lowest temp it would remain liquid and at the desired chip temp it would steam like mad... Does anyone at HP know what the fluid used is? It would solve a curious question!
rc_5
Occasional Advisor

Re: leakin heatpipes...

Ah and I forgot there was no residue at all the new part cost $18!!
A. Clay Stephenson
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: leakin heatpipes...

This is Looney Tunes. The working fuild must be carefully mated to the application. One of the most important properties is wettability because that has a profound impact upon how well the fuiold moves by capillary action. Vapor pressure is also critical; moreover, depending upon the working fluid used, the pipes cannot be sealed at room temperature and pressure. It's time to buy a new part unless you don't mind cooking an otherwise perfectly good CPU.

This will give you a brief explanation of what is involved.
http://www.cheresources.com/htpipes.shtml
If it ain't broke, I can fix that.
rc_5
Occasional Advisor

Re: leakin heatpipes...

Well,

I had no intentions of re-building the little critter. It was from a laptop. I bought the replacement part for $18 dollars!! Heck Ive already cut the thing apart!! Just for grins I found this online for you viewing pleasure. It does not have the cappilarry action but it sure does work!!! Ammonia and R12 have some of the best latent heat removal curves. The proof is in the pudding.
http://www.benchtest.com/heat_pipe1.html