HPE EVA Storage

Decommissioning EVA5000 - HSV110: OCP method v. Command View

 
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Vague Assumption
Frequent Advisor

Decommissioning EVA5000 - HSV110: OCP method v. Command View

I'm preparing to decommission an EVA5000. 

 

The data's been moved off and I need to shut the system down. 

 

 I'm planning to do this from the operator control panel (OCP) because the Command View utility doesn't seem to be able to discover the SAN any longer -- this system has had a long and eventful life, including multiple power outages.  While I investigate this, let me ask about the difference between Command View and OCP methods.

 

Specifically, Page 101 of

 

HP StorageWorks

Enterprise Virtual Array 3000/5000 User Guide

Part Number 5697-5414

Eighth Edition: June 2005

 

says:  "Caution: to power the system off for more than 96 hours, use Command View EVA."

 

Why is that?  What happens if I can't resuscitate the Command View Tool?

 

 

 

3 REPLIES 3
Johan Guldmyr
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: Decommissioning EVA5000 - HSV110: OCP method v. Command View

I would presume this has something to do with the batteries.

Are you going to do something about the batteries by the way ? That's if they are working/you want to keep them working.

I don't remember what the solution was (maybe just disconnect them) but when we turned off our EVA5000 for without doing anything the batteries broke.
Vague Assumption
Frequent Advisor

Re: Decommissioning EVA5000 - HSV110: OCP method v. Command View

Thanks for replying, Johan.

 

I agree.  It might have something to do with the battery life.  At any rate, I was able to bring the Command View back to life, and now I can shut the system down without worry.

 

I do have a concern about wiping data off the system.

Johan Guldmyr
Honored Contributor

Re: Decommissioning EVA5000 - HSV110: OCP method v. Command View

Great!

 

About that.

 

To wipe it should be enough to uninitialize the EVA and before that delete all the vdisks.

 

You could of course also create a large vdisk / mount and and just write zeroes all over it.