SAN Zoning

 
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Rob Crooks
Frequent Advisor

SAN Zoning

I am struggling with configuring SAN zoning and came across a question that no one seems to have an answer for. Although I have used a Brocade fabric with 2 switches for years now and not had a problem, now I have to use both Windows and VMS hosts on the same SAN (they were physically separate before). From HP recommendations, I have to zone the VMS cluster away from the Windows clusters .

 

My question is if I create a zone that consists of just the VMS cluster, do I have to create a zone for the Windows clusters as well?

Does creation of one soft zone between the two VMS hosts and the two EVAs automatically stop access between the other hosts and the EVA?

 

I have heard that SAN Zoning is somewhat analogous to Ethernet VLANs. In the case where I would create VLANs to segregate traffic between VMS hosts and Windows hosts, it wouldn't disrupt traffic between the hosts that aren't VLAN'd.

 

Can the same be said for SAN Zoning?

 

I have attached a rough image of my system. I don't think I need to cascade the switches, and the Silkworm will be replaced by a C7000 with integrated switch in the next few months.

 

Any guidance would be appreciated.

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Torsten.
Acclaimed Contributor
Solution

Re: SAN Zoning

As soon as you enable zoning, all non-zoned ports are "disconnected".

You currently have 3 switches.

Let's start with one of the b-series switches inside the blade enclosure. Each will form a SAN.

Create a Zone on switch 1 for let's say
blade1+eva1+eva2
then
blade2+eva1+eva2
etc...

Do this for all the connection on both switches, then eable zoning.

If everythings works, do the same on the second switch.



If you will get another c7000 soon and you want to interconnect the switches, make sure you are using different domain IDs for each.

Hope this helps!
Regards
Torsten.

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Rob Crooks
Frequent Advisor

Re: SAN Zoning

The answer i was looking for! Thank you.

 

i forgot to ask, and based upon your response I think I know the answer already, but to be sure...

 

I need to create a zone consisting of the 4 ports on the EVA's as well? To make sure that CA replication isn't blocked?

 

thanks again

 

 

 

Torsten.
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: SAN Zoning

All devices inside a single zone can "see" each other. If you don't want devices can "see" each other, put them in different zones.

Some prefer this:

eva1 port1 + server1 hba1 = a zone
eva1 port2 + server1hba1 = a zone
etc ...

but some prefer this
all eva ports connected to a switch + serverahba1 = a zone
etc.

This make not really a difference, except you have much more zones.

Hope this helps!
Regards
Torsten.

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Johan Guldmyr
Honored Contributor

Re: SAN Zoning

I don't think it's recommended to use all the ports for CA, but yes, you should create zone(s) with some of the host ports of both EVAs.

HP's "SAN Design Reference Manual" should tell you how many of the host ports you should dedicate to CA traffic.

 

Generally you don't want to have different hosts in the same zone, as they don't need to communicate anyway.

 

In some ways VLAN is similar to zoning, in some ways not. Zoning can also be thought of as a way to enable devices to communicate.