Ignite-UX

Re: Transfering O/S to another disk

 
Jungsan Yang
New Member

Transfering O/S to another disk

Hello,
I became a system administrator in a small company. I was assigned to resolve
Y2K problem, but I could not intall any patches for 9000 series (D250, HP10.20)
only because there are not enough disk space in /var (and anywhere). I bought
a new hard disk and trying to transfer the entire system to the new, bigger
drive. The problem is... I have no experience of doing that. All I have is a
unix adminstrator's hand book and 'man page'. Can you tell me what to do
first? and general procedure (summary of steps)? I'll truly appreciate your
response. Thanks.
-- Jungsan from Fetterolf Corp. --
4 REPLIES 4
Wootton Simon
New Member

Re: Transfering O/S to another disk

I've only had slightly more experience then yourself on the above, maybe you
need to look at using your extra disk to enable you to extend the size of the
/var filesystem (extendfs command) once the new disk is within a volume group.
Anthony Goonetilleke_1
Regular Advisor

Re: Transfering O/S to another disk

A good way of doing this is adding the new disk as a mirror and then breaking
the mirror after that you have to change the boot path. There are some docs on
the HP site for this let me know if you need more help.
Servio Cabrera_2
New Member

Re: Transfering O/S to another disk

There are several ways to do it:
* The mirror way
* You can add the new disk to the Root Volume Group and then extend the /var
filesystem.
* Or you can use Ignite/UX for 10.20, using the "make_recovery" including the
whole root vg, it will create a Bootable Tape, with all the information you
need to transfer the OS. The you replace the Old disk with the new disk and
boot from the Tape, and restore in advance mode so you can customize the
Recovery. This method is used to clone systems, and is quite safe.
Dave Wherry_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: Transfering O/S to another disk

The make recovery method seems to be the best. If you mirror to the larger
drive your logical volumes remain the same size. If one of the volumes that is
low on space needs to be contiguous then you can not increase it's size.
Create the make_recovery tape:
make_recovery -AvCd /dev/rmt/0m
substitute the correct device file for your
tape drive.

Then reboot the system. Interupt the boot and boot off of the tape. You will
be put into what seems to be an installation session. Here you can resize the
logical volumes. Everything will be reloaded and it works great.
make_recovery only backs up vg00. If you have other volume groups on the
system they will not be touched. If you do not touch the drives that those
volume groups are on, they will be there when the make_recovery completes.
Just in case of a hicup, back up all non vg00 data first.