Ignite-UX

creating custom make_recovery tape

 
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Chris Zimo
Occasional Advisor

creating custom make_recovery tape

I have a few questions regarding the creation of a make_recovery tape. The system I am working on is a HP9000K210 using HP-UX 10.2. I am removing 12 2gb disk drives and replacing them with 3 18gb drives. My plans are to create a make_recovery tape prior to the removal of the old disks that I can use to reload the OS when the new disks are installed. I am sort of confused on the procedure I need to follow to create the custom make_recovery tape, what files to include/exclude, and what I need to change, etc... Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.
6 REPLIES 6
Mark Greene_1
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: creating custom make_recovery tape

try using the -A option to include all of vg00, and then use" -x inc_entire=vg01" for each additional volume group. You can test this with the -p option to do preview mode. It won't actually run the backup, but will build the script and files that will be used for the backup. You can then review the output and the files from the preview, and then change the -p option with -r to resume.

man make_recovery for more info.

HTH
mark
the future will be a lot like now, only later
James R. Ferguson
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: creating custom make_recovery tape

Hi Chris:

Your Ignite recovery tape is designed to capture vg00 and restore it. You can make it thusly (using current Ignite software):

# make_tape_recovery -x inc_entire=vg00 -I -v -a /dev/rmt/0mn

As for your non-vg00 volumes, you should plan to create them from scratch (pvcreate, vgcreate, lvcreate, etc.) and reload their filesystems from appropriate backup media.

Regards!

...JRF...
Patrick Wallek
Honored Contributor

Re: creating custom make_recovery tape

What data is on your 2GB disk drives? Is it just vg00 or is there additional data as well.

make_tape_recovery (the command you should use to make the tape) is really just intended to be a vg00 backup and not a backup solution for the rest of your data.

If it is just your vg00 on the disks you are replaceing then this will work:

make_tape_recovery -a /dev/rmt/?mn -I -v -x inc_entire=vg00

If you are also replacing data disks, then I would still create the tape as above, but then backup your other data using fbackup. Then once you have installed the new disks and gotten vg00 restored you can restore the rest of your data from your fbackup tape.
Helen French
Honored Contributor

Re: creating custom make_recovery tape

Hi Chris,

# make_tape_recovery -x inc_entire=vg00 -I -v -a /dev/rmt/0mn

This will create the recovery tape which includes the entire root disk/volume group. Use -a with a non rewind tape device if you need to specify another device_name. Make 2 recovery tapes for safety.

You need to take a full system backup, inorder to restore your data. You have to manually create all other VGs and LVs. Make sure that you have all necessary config files backed up before you re-install the OS.

Also for old version, Use:

# make_recovery -A -C -v -d /dev/rmt/0m

HTH,
Shiju
Life is a promise, fulfill it!
Helen French
Honored Contributor

Re: creating custom make_recovery tape

Hi again,

Sorry, missed the 'n' in the last session

# make_recovery -A -C -v -d /dev/rmt/0mn

HTH,
Shiju
Life is a promise, fulfill it!
Chris Zimo
Occasional Advisor

Re: creating custom make_recovery tape

Thank you for your responses. Just a few more questions however. I do plan on restoring my other volume groups from my fbackup tape when my OS is restored to the new disks. The man pages for make_recovery states if the disks on the system have been changed, the install process can detect that the hardware is different, and starts up the install user interface to allow changes to the configuration. I would like to eliminate any operator intervention if possible when booting my system from the igninte tape. Is it possible to prepare for this when creating the make_recovery tape from my old disks? I am also concerned with the files /etc/fstab, /etc/lvmtab, /etc/ioconfig. How should I handle these files, and are there other files I should be concerned with?