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Mirroring a VxVM rootdg in integrity platform

 
Emil Velez
Honored Contributor

Re: Mirroring a VxVM rootdg in integrity platform

This is one of the nice things about vxvm

1. Base VXVM lets you mirror your boot disk only with no additional products
2. Its done with 1 command

Assuming you have another disk you just run the vxrootmir command with the extra disk and it initializes the disk with a EFI, adds it to the vxvm disk group and mirrors all of the volumes.

J. Deverel
Occasional Advisor

Re: Mirroring a VxVM rootdg in integrity platform

Thanks for the answers so far but I am still not clear about a couple of things:

1. my setboot says:

Primary bootpath : 0/4/1/0.0.0.2.0
HA Alternate bootpath : 0/0/2/0
Alternate bootpath : 0/4/1/0.0.0.2.0

And the server has booted off of this disk without any manual intervention, so I am assuming this is actually my boot disk.

and my vxdisk list says:

DEVICE TYPE DISK GROUP STATUS
c1t0d0 auto:hpdisk rootdg02 rootdg online
c1t1d0 auto:hpdisk rootdg01 rootdg online
c1t2d0 auto:hpdisk rootdg03 rootdg online
c1t3d0s2 auto:hpdisk rootdisk01 rootdg online

according to the ioscan output below:

disk 1 0/4/1/0.0.0.0.0 sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP DG072A8B54
/dev/dsk/c1t0d0 /dev/rdsk/c1t0d0
/dev/dsk/c1t0d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c1t0d0s2
disk 2 0/4/1/0.0.0.1.0 sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP DG072A9BB7
/dev/dsk/c1t1d0 /dev/rdsk/c1t1d0
disk 3 0/4/1/0.0.0.2.0 sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP DG072A9BB7
/dev/dsk/c1t2d0 /dev/rdsk/c1t2d0
/dev/dsk/c1t2d0s1 /dev/rdsk/c1t2d0s1
/dev/dsk/c1t2d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c1t2d0s2
/dev/dsk/c1t2d0s3 /dev/rdsk/c1t2d0s3
disk 4 0/4/1/0.0.0.3.0 sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP DG072A8B54
/dev/dsk/c1t3d0 /dev/rdsk/c1t3d0
/dev/dsk/c1t3d0s1 /dev/rdsk/c1t3d0s1
/dev/dsk/c1t3d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c1t3d0s2
/dev/dsk/c1t3d0s3 /dev/rdsk/c1t3d0s3


my boot disk c1t2d0. Is this a right assumtion or is there any other commands (VxVM commands) which can definitely tell me which one is my actual boot disk that I booted from the last time ?

2. My other unclear point is, why the last disk in the vxdisk list output has an "s2" suffix and DISK name is showing differently than the others ? I am very much inclined to make this last disk in the list my root mirror but naming difference as well as the s2 suffix, somehow sounds wrong to me. Can someone tell me which is the best and logical choice to designate as a root mirror here ?

Thank you again.

J.

Torsten.
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Mirroring a VxVM rootdg in integrity platform

On a itanium platform boot disks are always partitioned, 1. partition for efi, 2. partition for hp-ux and 3. partition for service tools.

This second partition is the "s2", e.g. c1t3d0s2, which is the only partition under HP-UX control on this disk.

Hope this helps!
Regards
Torsten.

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J. Deverel
Occasional Advisor

Re: Mirroring a VxVM rootdg in integrity platform

@ Torsten's last post

According to what you just said, my boot disk is actually c1t3d0s2. Is that right ?

Because since there is no s2 slice on c1t2d0, it can not be hpux boot disk on Integrity machine. Am I correct ?
Torsten.
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: Mirroring a VxVM rootdg in integrity platform

I think so ...

Hope this helps!
Regards
Torsten.

__________________________________________________
There are only 10 types of people in the world -
those who understand binary, and those who don't.

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Highlighted
Ismail Azad
Esteemed Contributor

Re: Mirroring a VxVM rootdg in integrity platform

Hi,

> Is this a right assumtion or is there any other commands (VxVM commands) which can definitely tell me which one is my actual boot disk....

If your disk is a VxVM boot disk, you can run this command and get an output ....

1) vxvmboot -v cxtxdx
for the label file and in terms of the partition, also check the system and HPSP with
2) efi_ls -d /efi/hpux

These commands are a few commands used for verification of the boot disk.. now you would know which one is a VxVM bootable disk as the vxvmboot command will NOT WORK on an LVM boot disk if there is one for some reason.

Regards
Ismail Azad




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