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Darren Murray_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: /dev/root

No errors occur when the server boots.
The lvdisplay shows no stale extents.
Checked rc.log and there are no errors in there either.

If I boot the machine into single user mode i get sh errors when trying to execute any command. If I boot the machine into maintenance mode and then do a vgchange -a y /dev/vgroot and do a mount -a I can then execute commands.
Sridhar Bhaskarla
Honored Contributor

Re: /dev/root

Hmmm 'sh errors'?. Can you post the exact messages you are getting?. If you booted the system first into maintenance mode and then into multi-user, then you cannot get rid of /dev/root until you reboot it normally.

-Sri
You may be disappointed if you fail, but you are doomed if you don't try
Darren Murray_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: /dev/root

the fstab looks like this

/dev/vgroot/root / hfs defaults 0 1
/dev/vgroot/usr /usr hfs defaults 0 2
/dev/vgroot/opt /opt hfs defaults 0 2
/dev/vgroot/home /home hfs defaults 0 2
/dev/vgroot/var /var hfs defaults 0 2
Sridhar Bhaskarla
Honored Contributor

Re: /dev/root

Hi,

Don't you have a /stand filesystem?. What do you have your 'boot' volume defined as?. 'lvlnboot -v'.

I see the non-default names for the vg00 LVs like (root, usr etc.,). I actually like it and configure them on my systems too. But during the reconfiguration there is a good chance that we may miss to rename some lvols and that can make /etc/fstab to go stale.

?? any clues there?

-Sri
You may be disappointed if you fail, but you are doomed if you don't try
Darren Murray_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: /dev/root




There is no /stand file system but thats standard for the workstation and its age Im pretty sure.
Robert-Jan Goossens
Honored Contributor

Re: /dev/root

Darren,

Take a look at this doc.

http://www5.itrc.hp.com/service/cki/docDisplay.do?docLocale=en_US&docId=200000073839205

Document description: Migrating Root Volume Group to new disk(s).
Document id: LVMKBRC00007285

Regards,
Robert-Jan
Darren Murray_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: /dev/root

I dont have a spare disk unfortunately to do this to. Any other ideas??
Sridhar Bhaskarla
Honored Contributor

Re: /dev/root

Darren,

What are those 'sh errors' you are getting when you logon using single-user mode?.

-Sri
You may be disappointed if you fail, but you are doomed if you don't try
Darren Murray_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: /dev/root

The sh errors are like

sh: more: not found
sh: bdf: not found
Highlighted
John Palmer
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: /dev/root

Your sh errors are caused because /usr isnt't mounted. They're nothing to do with your original problem.

How long has the server been in this state? It's obviously not a standard installation because you've got vgroot instead of vg00.

The root filesystem doesn't actually get mounted because of its entry in /etc/fstab, it's actually located using pointers held in the volume group (reported by lvlnboot -v).

I suspect that there may be something amiss with the way /dev/vgroot/root is defined.

Could you please post the output from the following:
- lvlnboot -v
- ll /dev/vgroot
- vgdisplay -v vgroot

Regards,
John