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Files Deleted

 
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Occasional Advisor

Files Deleted

Hi!

 

After restarting the server where HP MSA 1000 is connected the screen was showing "resetting security on the files" before loading windows. We immediately restarted the server and after windows loaded we found many of our files and fodlers were deleted from the storage and the security for all foders was reset and only admin was left under ntfs permissions.

 

Windows 2008 R2

 

Any suggestions?

 

 

P.S. This thread has been moevd from General to Storage Area Networks (SAN) (Small and Medium Business). - Hp Forum Moderator

5 REPLIES 5
Johan Guldmyr
Honored Contributor

Re: Files Deleted

Hi!

This sounds like an Windows question. The MSA just provides storage - what happens on it is up to the OS. Perhaps you've gotten virus or changed something before the reboot?
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor

Re: Files Deleted

It sounds like your disk was corrupted and Windows was probably running CHDSK at boot time to try and fix it.

If you forced a server restart in the middle of the CHKDSK, that may have made the problem worse.

 

This is exactly why you are supposed to take backups of your data.

 

Just restore the missing files from the latest backup, if you have it.

If you don't have a backup and the data was critical, don't write anything to that disk/LUN, and contact data recovery professionals.

 

Determining the root cause of the disk corruption may be difficult. Did the server crash before the first restart you mentioned? Check the event logs to see if there are any crash reports or other signs of trouble.

MK
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Occasional Advisor

Re: Files Deleted

The server is running fine. It did not crash. I need to ask one more thing. Before it hapenned the storage was connected to two servers and the same drives (Luns) were configured on both servers by iscsi initiator. There was no clustering between servers for hp storage. One thing I noted that updating files on storage from one server were not immediately shown by the luns on the second server. I had to restart the server to get the updated files on the 2nd server. Can this cause any problem if you just connect the storage through iscsi initiator on two servers without checking the proper way to connect them?

Thanks.
Johan Guldmyr
Honored Contributor

Re: Files Deleted

There was a post by Matti earlier today about that. You need to use a clustering service / filesystem if you have a shared disk between two servers.

http://h30499.www3.hp.com/t5/System-Administration/Redhat-6-2-Without-Cluster-Shared-LUNS-READ-WRITE/m-p/5918635#M54026
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor

Re: Files Deleted

>One thing I noted that updating files on storage from one server were not immediately shown by the luns on the second server. I had to restart the server to get the updated files on the 2nd server.

 

After the second server had read the directory metadata once, it held the metadata in its cache. Since nothing informed the second server that the first one had made some changes to the disk, the second server assumed that its cached copy was still good. Any write operation to that directory from the second server could have replaced the directory metadata with the version from the second server, effectively overwriting the changes made by the first server.

 

This can happen anywhere and everywhere on the shared disk:

  • with the data in your files, so your files will be corrupted
  • with the directory metadata, so filenames and permissions will be corrupted
  • with the block allocation metadata, so the filesystem's idea of what blocks are free and what are in use will get distorted... and that will cause yet more situations where important data or metadata can get overwritten

Once you realize the full implications of this, you'll understand why sharing a LUN with only storage-level protocols won't work with normal non-cluster filesystems.

 

This is true for all storage-level protocols that can present a disk/LUN to two or more hosts simultaneously:

  • differential SCSI
  • FibreChannel
  • iSCSI
  • ATA over Ethernet
  • FCOE
  • etc.

There are other ways to share a filesystem to multiple hosts. Things like NFS and CIFS (=Windows file sharing) can certainly do it... but in both cases, the actual disk access is done by a single system at a time. This system can be either a normal server or a dedicated NAS device.

MK