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New slave NIS server does not appear in the ypservers file

Andrew Kaplan
Super Advisor

New slave NIS server does not appear in the ypservers file

Hi there --

I went through the motions of adding a new slave NIS server to our domain. I logged onto the master server and verified the host in question was listed properly in the /etc/hosts file.

I then created a text file via the makedbm command. The slave server was added to the tempfile, and the ypservers file was regenerated with the makedbm command. I then ran ypmake, and no errors were reported.

However, when I run the ypcat -k ypservers command, the new nis server does not appear on the list.

What step(s) do I need to take in order to correct this? Thanks.
A Journey In The Quest Of Knowledge
6 REPLIES
Steven Schweda
Honored Contributor

Re: New slave NIS server does not appear in the ypservers file

uname -a

No doubt, you know what your system is, but
some of us non-psychics may have forgotten.

> I then created a text file [...]

Have you considered the advantages of showing
the actual commands you used instead of
offering such a vague pseudo-description?

> [...] I then ran ypmake, and no errors
> were reported.

But did it _do_ anything? Again, an actual
transcript might show something.


It's been a long time, but as I (dimly)
recall, ...

I'd just do "ypinit -m" on the NIS master
server, which (as I recall) asks for a list
of NIS servers, from which it creates the
appropriate data base files (properly, using
actual commands). Then, I suspect that you'd
need to do a "yppush" to get the new server
list propagated around.
Steven Schweda
Honored Contributor

Re: New slave NIS server does not appear in the ypservers file

Also, around here, /usr/sbin/ypinit is a
shell script, so it's possible to investigate
what it would do when you run it. If nothing
else, it might offer a trustworthy how-to
guide for the things which it can do.
Andrew Kaplan
Super Advisor

Re: New slave NIS server does not appear in the ypservers file

Hi there --

Sorry about including the procedure that I used in my original posting. Included with this one, are the steps that I used to add the slave nis server to the domain.

The domain name is radonc, and the new slave server is rtp47. The master nis server is space.

A Journey In The Quest Of Knowledge
TTr
Honored Contributor

Re: New slave NIS server does not appear in the ypservers file

Where/when do the NIS daemons get started on the slave? Are they running?
/etc/rc.config.d/namesvrs (configure)
/sbin/init.d/nis.server start
/sbin/init.d/nis.client start

Steps 13-17 are very drastic and require having a client that you can reboot. The NIS slave is also an NIS client and usually binds to itself. "ypwhich" on the NIS slave would show the binding.

Also you need to keep up with your point assignment. Read my personal quote.

Steven Schweda
Honored Contributor

Re: New slave NIS server does not appear in the ypservers file

> Sorry about [not?] including [...]

Seeing the instructions which you were
supposed to follow is not exactly the same as
seeing what you actually did. Just as seeing
your description of what you did is not
exactly the same as seeing what you actually
did (or what actually happened when you did
it).

And whence came this guide, and for which
environments is it supposed to be useful?

> I'd just do "ypinit -m" [...]

I know that it may appear to be too simple
and reliable, but have you considered trying
that?


> However, when I run the ypcat -k ypservers
> command, the new nis server does not appear
> on the list.

"ypcat" is asking some NIS server for the
info. ("ypwhich".) Even if the master's
maps have been updated, and I have no actual
evidence that they have, then you still might
need to do a "yppush" to get the results
propagated out to the other servers.


> uname -a

Would this reveal some super secret?
Andrew Kaplan
Super Advisor

Re: New slave NIS server does not appear in the ypservers file

> Seeing the instructions which you were
> supposed to follow is not exactly the same as
> seeing what you actually did. Just as seeing
> your description of what you did is not
> exactly the same as seeing what you actually
> did (or what actually happened when you did
> it).

What I did was follow the steps in the procedure.

> And whence came this guide, and for which
> environments is it supposed to be useful?

This guide was written by me, and proofread by a colleague of mine who works with NIS environments.

> I'd just do "ypinit -m" [...]
> I know that it may appear to be too simple
> and reliable, but have you considered
> trying that?

My thinking was the approach that I outlined would be the safer method to use in this case.

> uname -a
> Would this reveal some super secret?

What server(s) do you need me to run that command on to get the information in question?
A Journey In The Quest Of Knowledge