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Unix box using PC modem

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SM_3
Super Advisor

Unix box using PC modem

I have a PC on the network with an ADSL modem.

A unix box is on the same network. Can the unix box use the ADSL modem via the network?
3 REPLIES
Patrick Ruane
Valued Contributor
Solution

Re: Unix box using PC modem

I assume the ADSL modem is directly connected to the pc (USB or Serial). Yes this is possible, you can use a windows pc as a gateway to non windows clients. Personally i use windows 98 with TCP/IP (it may be possible with IPX/SPX too). Under win98, simply go into control panel and select Add & Remove Programs. Select Windows Setup and go to the Internet submenu. Tick the Internet Connection Sharing checkbox and click ok. Skip the client disk creation and share the appropriate "network" connection (your modem).

Under NT and 2000 you will have to use Routing and RAS admin, which comes with 2000 and can be downloaded from www.microsoft.com for NT (it does come with a basic routing program, but I would suggest getting the update).

I have to ask the question, why not use your Unix box as the router? or better still, try Linux? I've found it to be a far more capable and stable networked operating system ;)
working harder, making better, doing faster makes us stronger
SM_3
Super Advisor

Re: Unix box using PC modem

I'm using Windows 2000 Professional.

Someone metioned that I should change the PC IP address to 192.168.0.1 and Enable Internet Connection Sharing- but the unix box and PC could not ping each other.

The IP addresses are in the /etc/hosts file respectively.

What's the significance of 192.168.0.1?
Patrick Ruane
Valued Contributor

Re: Unix box using PC modem

192.168.0.* is a "private" network address - meaning that you won't clash with any internet IP addresses if you do accidentally connect this interface directly to the internet (not something you need to worry about i would have thought).

It is also the default network address used by Microsoft (at least with Win9*, i'm not sure about 2000) and is therefore easier to work with as you won't have to reconfigure too much to get it working. It's also the address given in help files etc.

I personally use this network range at home as it tends to be more reliable than others (more due to me setting the network up wrong i suspect).

Anyway, good luck with everything.
working harder, making better, doing faster makes us stronger