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Is there a way to speed up my modem?

Jon Williams
Occasional Visitor

Is there a way to speed up my modem?

I recently bought a hp pavilion 8760C computer. A Conexant SoftK56 Data, Fax, PCI Modem was one of the devices that came with my computer. When I connected to the internet, I noticed that my modem ran on average about 5-7k/s. I know my modem can go faster than this. Is there anyone affiliated with tech/support that can help me? Thank you.
I just want fast internet access
5 REPLIES
Dwain Erhart
Occasional Advisor

Re: Is there a way to speed up my modem?

Generally we have a problem with phone lines in rural residents... I had this same problem, used some cat5e cable out to my phone box and my modem sped up dramatically.
Feed me chocolate, or the network comes down at noon!
Tim Malnati
Honored Contributor

Re: Is there a way to speed up my modem?

Actually, for a tcp connection on a 56K modem, your throughput is about all you will see. I'm not sure why you think you should have more. You have to keep in mind that that there are a variety of factors preventing faster throughput. FCC regs won't allow you to connect at full 56K (49,333 is usually max, but an x2 connection will allow slightly more). Your dealing with async comms which add some overhead. And the tcp protocol itself adds some more. 5.6k/s is nominal for uncompressed throughput.

Dwain's comment regarding using cat5 cable is a good one to keep in mind though. Typical residential telephone wiring is constructed with straight lengths of wire instead of twisted pairs. Without the twisted pairs, a large amount of other electrical influences can find their way into your line during a modem call and require your modem to adjust speeds to compensate for the interferance. It's also a good idea not to have multiple phone circiuts in the same cable. Twisted pairs will usually attenuate cross-talk problems from the other circiut, but if the other line is receiving a ringing signal, the voltage jumps a large amount and can cause interferance anyway. The best solution is to have a straight section of cat5 from the demarkation block going directly to your modem. The wire run should avoid other electical wiring as much as possible.
bill smith_1
Occasional Visitor

Re: Is there a way to speed up my modem?

Both of the other answers are excelent answers if taken seriosly but You will want to use plenum grade wire that is cat5(physically tested to meet continuety) Im sure thats what they really meant. Here is a link to a sight that will test out your line for 56k compatability. A couple more things you will definately want to check is what type of modem you dial in to. If your running flex and they are v.90, all you have to do is switch protocalls by loading a v.90 driver(or vice versa). Anouther thing to keep in mind is that a 56k modem only means one thing which is usually posted somewhere in small print in the manual or on the box.
I will upload at up to 36k and might go up to 56k on downlad. If you go to www.driversguide.com, they have extensive drivers and resources for links to most companies. ie. Lucent, Conexant, Rockwell, 3com, ect. Heres that link and I hope it helps.

http://www.3com.com/56k/need4_56k/linetest.html
If everyone were as smart as they thought we would all be in trouble.
Tim Malnati
Honored Contributor

Re: Is there a way to speed up my modem?

Plenum grade is a fire retardency rating associated with the materials used to manufacture the cable (insulation, jacket, etc). The reason for this specific rating is that it is designed to be exposed in the air plenum (drop ceiling area) that is common in most modern office environments. The NFPA added the requirement to the electrical code in order to prevent this cabling from contributing to the overall flammablity of materials in this space, and additionally to control the elements added to the smoke if the space were to become involved in a fire (particularly chlorides). With all this said, it should be somewhat obvious that the plenum rating has little to do with the electrical characteristics of the cable. "Physically tested to meet continuity" has nothing to do with the plenum rating either; it's a quality test statement that can be applied to any grade of cable.
Nathan Schaufler
Occasional Contributor

Re: Is there a way to speed up my modem?

GET COX@HOME. IF YOU HAVE ALL 3 COX SERVICES, IT'S ACTUALLY PRETTY CHEAP... PHONE SERVICE, TV SERVICE (WHICH KICKS ASS) AND COX @ HOME.