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How to increase the EWA0 speed ?

 
Ofery
Occasional Advisor

How to increase the EWA0 speed ?

Hello,

 

We have Alpha VMS V6.2 emulation under Charon & the Network card capacity shows only 10mb & half duplex.

Is there any way to increase it ?

 

Regards /Ofer

 

 

LANCP> sho dev EWA0 /param

.....

.....

No Full Duplex enable

No Full Duplex operational

....

...

10 line speed (megabits/second)

 

4 REPLIES 4
Volker Halle
Honored Contributor

Re: How to increase the EWA0 speed ?

Ofer,

 

you can not see the real network interface speed from the emulated LAN interface in CHARON-AXP.

 

The LAN speed is determined between the network switch and the CHARON host server network card driver.

 

What kind of emulated interface are you using in CHARON-AXP ? SHOW DEV/FULL EWA0 ?

 

Volker.

Ofery
Occasional Advisor

Re: How to increase the EWA0 speed ?

Hi Volker,

 

I'm out of the office till monday, so I can not answer your question, I will post that later.

 

>>>you can not see the real network interface speed from the emulated LAN interface in CHARON-AXP

So, what is the "10mb" & the "half duplex"  I'm getting in the show dev/param ? 

 

Regards /Ofer

Volker Halle
Honored Contributor

Re: How to increase the EWA0 speed ?

Ofer,

 

if you're using the default CHARON-AXP emulated network interface, it might emulate the DE435 network card, which only supported 10 Mbit and Half-Duplex.

 

Be assured, that - in this case - the real speed and duplex setting is independent of the characteristics seen from OpenVMS in the CHARON-AXP emulator.

 

Volker.

Hoff
Honored Contributor

Re: How to increase the EWA0 speed ?

A different approach to this than what Volker suggests...  

 

You're on an emulator.  Run some performance tests.  See what you get.   Short of an emulator with physical hardware pass-through capabilities, everything you're shown is entirely fictional.  All of your hardware is software-simulated, including the processor and all I/O devices — changes on the ilk of a few bytes returned to VMS device probes and alter some emulation configuration data, and VMS would think you were on a GS1280 or a DEC 2000 AXP.

 

With emulators in general, sufficient application performance, and the stability and correctness of the hardware emulation environment matters far more than what the emulator reports to VMS.

 

There's not really a point in constructing the emulation of a dozen different network devices, when some rinky-dink PCI emulator is getting a decent chunk of the performance of some hypothetical underlying 10 GbE NIC in the physical hardware, or is using the virtual networking to communcate among guests within the same host system, for instance.

 

Benchmark for your particular application performance constraints, and see what you're getting for performance, and work from there.  With emulation, what you see reported by VMS is a mirage.