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Lookup failure

 
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Piet Timmers_1
Frequent Advisor

Lookup failure

OpenVMS 7.2, TCPIP 5.1

The command $ TCPIP SHO HOST 3.3.3.3 gives me from the bind server a nodename, so this works as it should work.
The command $ TCPIP SHO HOST gives me an error, "not found".

What is wrong?

Greetings,

Piet Timmers
5 REPLIES
Karl Rohwedder
Honored Contributor

Re: Lookup failure

Piet,

perhaps something with your default domain or the path of the nameserver?

regards Kalle
Piet Timmers_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: Lookup failure

The most strange thing is, this behaviour is only for one node. All the other, as far I can see, are normal.
Ian Miller.
Honored Contributor

Re: Lookup failure

Can you post the result of

TCPIP SHOW NAME
____________________
Purely Personal Opinion
Jim_McKinney
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: Lookup failure

A (hostname to IP) and PTR (IP to hostname) DNS resource records are entirely separate. The presence of one in no way promises that there will be a companion record. You'll need to communicate with the manager of the authoritative DNS as it would appear that the A(ddress) record is absent from the registration.
Robert Gezelter
Honored Contributor

Re: Lookup failure

Piet,

Call me "Old Fashioned", but I generally use nslookup for DNS checks.

Jim is certainly correct, forward and reverse DNS are by no means guaranteed to be synchronized. In most (almost all) DNS implementations, these two are maintained separately (often by completely different organizations; the forward is maintained by the owner of the sub-domain to which the machine belongs, the reverse is maintained, by necessity, by the group responsible for actual physical network connections, rarely are these groups one and the same).

- Bob Gezelter, http://www.rlgsc.com