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OpenVMS LSE

 
openvms_automat
Occasional Contributor

OpenVMS LSE

Is there a way in LSE to detect highlighted text? I'm also looking for a way to run a custom symbol or COM file within LSE?

 

Really what I'm trying to acheive is a way to hightlight code and then extract it out into a method. Basically to help refactor.

 

Thanks

2 REPLIES 2
Hoff
Honored Contributor

Re: OpenVMS LSE

Text highlighed by what?  An editor select range?  By user input with the mouse cursor?

 

DECset LSEDIT is a character-cell integrated development environment (IDE) tool.  LSEDIT is a programmer-targeted text editor that's built atop the TPU mechanisms.  TPU is a text processing utility and language unique to OpenVMS.  

 

LSEDIT is extensible, particularly using TPU language macros and related, but it's not particularly designed nor intended intended to be controlled by an application.  This is not a typical task for DECset LSEDIT.

 

If you're refactoring application source code, then vim, emacs or a related tool might be a better choice as an editor.   (And yes, I do realize it is somewhat odd to find that vim and emacs are more modern and more capable tools than is LSEDIT, but that's another discussion.)  vim script plugins might be able to get you where you want here, for instance.

 

For another potential option, the folks at eCube systems have demonstrated an IDE package for OpenVMS that might interest you.

 

If you're going to implement something with code sensitivty and related capabilitues, starting with LLVM would be a likely path.

 

Please explain what particular sorts of refactoring problem(s) you are solving in a little more detail, and with what sort of text files.  Are you implementing a full IDE here? 

Highlighted
jreagan
Advisor

Re: OpenVMS LSE

Yes, you can write a LSE/TPU function, bind it to a key (if you wish), then select (ie, "highlight") a section of code, and then invoke the function to do whatever you want (including save it to some file, insert it into a different buffer, etc.).