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System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

 
IFX_1
Frequent Advisor

System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

I ran "$ana/disk disk$alphasys83" and got the following results:

Being a system disk, is this critical that needs to be addressed immediately?

What's the safest way to address these errors?

Thanks in advance.

=================================
Analyze/Disk_Structure for _DSA899: started on 9-SEP-2008 09:21:56.19

%ANALDISK-I-OPENQUOTA, error opening QUOTA.SYS
-SYSTEM-W-NOSUCHFILE, no such file
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (10649,2,0) DCLTABLES.EXE;116
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (10858,244,0) DCLTABLES.EXE;118
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12404,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120E00433.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12421,2,0) TNT$HELPER_121000433.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12807,7,0) TNT$HELPER_120200427.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12834,1,0) DCLTABLES.EXE;120
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12852,5,0) TNT$HELPER_120200427.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12853,4,0) TNT$HELPER_120200427.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12870,4,0) TNT$HELPER_120200443.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12879,4,0) TNT$HELPER_120200428.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (12973,4,0) TNT$HELPER_120200427.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13047,2,0) DCLTABLES.EXE;121
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13083,3,0) TNT$HELPER_120200427.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13086,2,0) TNT$HELPER_12020043A.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13098,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200236.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13110,4,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023A.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13143,7,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023A.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13144,1,0) TNT$HELPER_12020043A.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13162,7,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023A.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13220,7,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023D.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13221,1,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023A.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13371,4,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023E.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13403,5,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023E.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13733,10,0) TNT$HELPER_120A00433.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13750,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120800433.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13751,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120400435.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (13804,11,0) TNT$HELPER_120C00433.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16348,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121200434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16366,2,0) TNT$HELPER_12140023D.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16570,2,0) TNT$HELPER_121600434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16582,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121800434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16621,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121A00435.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16634,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121C00435.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16651,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121E00434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16664,2,0) TNT$HELPER_122000242.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16712,1,0) TNT$HELPER_122200434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16738,22494,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023D.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16770,2,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023D.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16792,2,0) TNT$HELPER_12020023D.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16803,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120400434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16805,16,0) TNT$HELPER_12020014E.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16820,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120600434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16831,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120800435.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16855,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120A0023C.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16871,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120200444.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16884,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120600231.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16908,6,0) TNT$HELPER_120400259.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16928,2,0) TNT$HELPER_12080022E.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16963,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120A00240.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16977,31,0) TNT$HELPER_120C00428.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (16997,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120E00428.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17015,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121000428.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17025,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121200428.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17033,3,0) TNT$HELPER_121400428.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17048,2,0) TNT$HELPER_121600428.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17060,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121800429.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17079,1,0) TNT$HELPER_121A00428.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17101,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120200444.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17118,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200241.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17128,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120400434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17142,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120400258.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17167,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200241.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17176,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120400434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17199,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200241.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17221,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200241.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17233,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120400434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17254,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200245.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17276,3,0) TNT$HELPER_120200243.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17283,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200241.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17295,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120400434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17320,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120600434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17341,1,0) TNT$HELPER_120800434.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17354,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120A0042C.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17364,4,0) TNT$HELPER_120600438.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17385,32,0) TNT$HELPER_12040023A.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17387,9,0) TNT$HELPER_120200235.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17408,2,0) TNT$HELPER_12020022E.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17416,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120C0042C.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17485,11394,0) TNT$HELPER_120200243.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17489,11389,0) TNT$HELPER_120200240.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17512,2,0) TNT$HELPER_12040043C.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17592,3,0) TNT$HELPER_120400440.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17646,11,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-BAD_STRUC_LEVEL, STRUCLEV field is bad
-ANALDISK-I-INVHEADER_BUSY, invalid file header marked "busy"
in index file bitmap
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17682,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120800437.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17696,17,0) TNT$HELPER_120200243.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17711,24624,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-FIDNUM_ZERO, file number zero but not a valid deleted header
-ANALDISK-I-INVHEADER_BUSY, invalid file header marked "busy"
in index file bitmap
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17712,24624,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-FIDNUM_ZERO, file number zero but not a valid deleted header
-ANALDISK-I-INVHEADER_BUSY, invalid file header marked "busy"
in index file bitmap
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17713,24624,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-FIDNUM_ZERO, file number zero but not a valid deleted header
-ANALDISK-I-INVHEADER_BUSY, invalid file header marked "busy"
in index file bitmap
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17714,24624,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-FIDNUM_ZERO, file number zero but not a valid deleted header
-ANALDISK-I-INVHEADER_BUSY, invalid file header marked "busy"
in index file bitmap
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17715,24625,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-FIDNUM_ZERO, file number zero but not a valid deleted header
-ANALDISK-I-INVHEADER_BUSY, invalid file header marked "busy"
in index file bitmap
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17716,24625,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-FIDNUM_ZERO, file number zero but not a valid deleted header
-ANALDISK-I-INVHEADER_BUSY, invalid file header marked "busy"
in index file bitmap
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17717,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17718,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17719,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17720,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17721,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17722,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17723,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary
%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17724,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17738,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200247.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17756,2,0) TNT$HELPER_120200247.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-DELHEADER, file (17769,1,0) TNT$HELPER_12040043A.DAT;1
marked for delete
%ANALDISK-W-ALLOCCLR, blocks incorrectly marked allocated
LBN 7931552 to 7931567, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-ALLOCCLR, blocks incorrectly marked allocated
LBN 9530128 to 9530143, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-ALLOCCLR, blocks incorrectly marked allocated
LBN 9542688 to 9542799, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110417 to 110432
LBN 7926448 to 7926463, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17596,23,0) TCPIP$FTP_RUN.LOG;159
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7926448 to 7926463, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16873,5,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;67
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7926656 to 7926671, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 49 to 64
LBN 7926656 to 7926671, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16873,5,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;67
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 17 to 32
LBN 7926736 to 7926751, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 65 to 80
LBN 7926736 to 7926751, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16873,5,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;67
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 33 to 64
LBN 7926752 to 7926783, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 97 to 128
LBN 7926752 to 7926783, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 129 to 144
LBN 7928112 to 7928127, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16982,10,0) OPERATOR.LOG;45
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7928112 to 7928127, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 145 to 176
LBN 7928272 to 7928303, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17000,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;42
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 32
LBN 7928272 to 7928303, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 177 to 192
LBN 7928944 to 7928959, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17000,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;42
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 33 to 48
LBN 7928944 to 7928959, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 193 to 208
LBN 7928976 to 7928991, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17000,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;42
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 49 to 64
LBN 7928976 to 7928991, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110433 to 110448
LBN 7929040 to 7929055, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17596,23,0) TCPIP$FTP_RUN.LOG;159
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 33 to 48
LBN 7929040 to 7929055, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110449 to 110464
LBN 7929504 to 7929519, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17596,23,0) TCPIP$FTP_RUN.LOG;159
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 49 to 64
LBN 7929504 to 7929519, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 209 to 240
LBN 7929520 to 7929551, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17235,7,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;68
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 32
LBN 7929520 to 7929551, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 241 to 288
LBN 7929552 to 7929599, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552017 to 1552064
LBN 7929552 to 7929599, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552065 to 1552080
LBN 7929600 to 7929615, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 81 to 96
LBN 7929600 to 7929615, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 97 to 112
LBN 7929616 to 7929631, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17016,3,0) GLX$LICENSE_SERVER.LOG;67
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7929616 to 7929631, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 113 to 128
LBN 7929632 to 7929647, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17036,3,0) ACME$SERVER.LOG;66
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7929632 to 7929647, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 129 to 144
LBN 7929648 to 7929663, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552081 to 1552096
LBN 7929648 to 7929663, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 145 to 160
LBN 7929664 to 7929679, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17235,7,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;68
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 33 to 48
LBN 7929664 to 7929679, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17235,7,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;68
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 49 to 64
LBN 7929680 to 7929695, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110465 to 110480
LBN 7929680 to 7929695, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17235,7,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;68
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 49 to 64
LBN 7929680 to 7929695, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17596,23,0) TCPIP$FTP_RUN.LOG;159
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 17 to 32
LBN 7929680 to 7929695, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110465 to 110480
LBN 7929680 to 7929695, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17596,23,0) TCPIP$FTP_RUN.LOG;159
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 17 to 32
LBN 7929680 to 7929695, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17050,3,0) SYS$TIMEZONE.DAT;128
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7929776 to 7929791, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 161 to 176
LBN 7929776 to 7929791, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 177 to 192
LBN 7929792 to 7929807, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552337 to 1552352
LBN 7929792 to 7929807, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 193 to 208
LBN 7929808 to 7929823, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17854,1,0)
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 2033 to 2048
LBN 7929808 to 7929823, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 209 to 256
LBN 7929824 to 7929871, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 109761 to 109808
LBN 7929824 to 7929871, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 109809 to 109840
LBN 7929872 to 7929903, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 433 to 464
LBN 7929872 to 7929903, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17355,4,0) OPERATOR.LOG;43
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 17 to 64
LBN 7930128 to 7930175, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 48
LBN 7930128 to 7930175, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 49 to 64
LBN 7930176 to 7930191, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17145,5,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;23
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930176 to 7930191, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 65 to 80
LBN 7930192 to 7930207, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17255,2,0) WCCPROXYDETACHSTART.LOG;56
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930192 to 7930207, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 81 to 96
LBN 7930208 to 7930223, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17839,2,0) DBA_OPEN_COMDBV_SICAM8.LOG;8
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930208 to 7930223, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 97 to 128
LBN 7930224 to 7930255, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17263,7,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;69
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 32
LBN 7930224 to 7930255, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 129 to 192
LBN 7930256 to 7930319, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552097 to 1552160
LBN 7930256 to 7930319, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 193 to 240
LBN 7930320 to 7930367, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17227,9,0) DBMMON72.LOG;44
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 48
LBN 7930320 to 7930367, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 241 to 256
LBN 7930368 to 7930383, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17359,4,0) GLX$LICENSE_SERVER.LOG;68
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930368 to 7930383, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 257 to 272
LBN 7930384 to 7930399, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17396,12,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;24
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930384 to 7930399, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 273 to 288
LBN 7930400 to 7930415, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17575,51,0) WCCPROXYDETACHSTART.LOG;57
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930400 to 7930415, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 289 to 304
LBN 7930416 to 7930431, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17587,14,0) CCAT$STARTUP_ERROR_MSG.LOG;57
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930416 to 7930431, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 305 to 320
LBN 7930432 to 7930447, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (13846,207,0) TCPIP$SNMP_RUN.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930432 to 7930447, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 321 to 336
LBN 7930448 to 7930463, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552161 to 1552176
LBN 7930448 to 7930463, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 337 to 368
LBN 7930464 to 7930495, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17263,7,0) LAN$ACP.LOG;69
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 33 to 64
LBN 7930464 to 7930495, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 369 to 384
LBN 7930496 to 7930511, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (13568,130,0)
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 17 to 32
LBN 7930496 to 7930511, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 385 to 480
LBN 7930512 to 7930607, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17338,15,0) OPERATOR.LOG;44
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 96
LBN 7930512 to 7930607, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 481 to 496
LBN 7930608 to 7930623, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17323,4,0) ACME$SERVER.LOG;67
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930608 to 7930623, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17688,24634,0) DBMMON72.LOG;40
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 497 to 512
LBN 7930624 to 7930639, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552177 to 1552192
LBN 7930624 to 7930639, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552193 to 1552224
LBN 7930640 to 7930671, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 465 to 496
LBN 7930640 to 7930671, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 497 to 512
LBN 7930672 to 7930687, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17398,3,0) SYS$TIMEZONE.DAT;129
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930672 to 7930687, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17665,14,0)
y _€€ y € y
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 66369 to 66480
LBN 7930688 to 7930799, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17091,2,0)
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 7345 to 7456
LBN 7930688 to 7930799, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16737,22531,0) TCPIP$PCNFSD_RUN.LOG;28
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7930800 to 7930815, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 513 to 528
LBN 7930800 to 7930815, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 109873 to 109984
LBN 7930816 to 7930927, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 289 to 400
LBN 7930816 to 7930927, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 401 to 416
LBN 7930928 to 7930943, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (13568,130,0)
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 33 to 48
LBN 7930928 to 7930943, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (16584,3,0) OPERATOR.LOG;60
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 417 to 480
LBN 7930944 to 7931007, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 109985 to 110048
LBN 7930944 to 7931007, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110049 to 110096
LBN 7931008 to 7931055, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17516,6,0) DBA_IDLEKILL.LOG;6
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 529 to 576
LBN 7931008 to 7931055, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110097 to 110112
LBN 7931056 to 7931071, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17160,1,0)  Ô€ € Õ€ €
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 4465 to 4480
LBN 7931056 to 7931071, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110113 to 110128
LBN 7931072 to 7931087, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17596,23,0) TCPIP$FTP_RUN.LOG;159
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 65 to 80
LBN 7931072 to 7931087, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110129 to 110144
LBN 7931088 to 7931103, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17160,1,0)  Ô€ € Õ€ €
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 4481 to 4496
LBN 7931088 to 7931103, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110145 to 110160
LBN 7931104 to 7931119, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 111761 to 111776
LBN 7931104 to 7931119, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110161 to 110192
LBN 7931120 to 7931151, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110977 to 111008
LBN 7931120 to 7931151, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 111009 to 111024
LBN 7931152 to 7931167, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17181,5,0) TCPIP$SMTP_LOGFILE.LOG;59
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7931152 to 7931167, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 111025 to 111040
LBN 7931168 to 7931183, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) y €P y /€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552225 to 1552240
LBN 7931168 to 7931183, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 111041 to 111056
LBN 7931184 to 7931199, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17677,2,0) GLX$LICENSE_SERVER.LOG;69
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7931184 to 7931199, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 111057 to 111072
LBN 7931200 to 7931215, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17565,36,0) ACME$SERVER.LOG;68
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7931200 to 7931215, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0“‘ Ÿ€0”‘ O€àÿx €P y o€
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 111073 to 111088
LBN 7931216 to 7931231, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17258,9,0) DBMMON72.LOG;45
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1 to 16
LBN 7931216 to 7931231, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-BADDIRENT, invalid file identification in directory entry
[SYS0.SYSCOMMON.SYSEXE]SYS$TIMEZONE.DAT;130
-ANALDISK-I-BAD_DIRFIDSEQ, invalid file sequence number in directory file ID
%ANALDISK-W-BADDIRENT, invalid file identification in directory entry
[SYS0.SYSEXE]TCPIP$TELNETSYM_MAL_PRT5.LOG;22
-ANALDISK-I-BAD_DIRFIDSEQ, invalid file sequence number in directory file ID
%ANALDISK-W-BADDIRENT, invalid file identification in directory entry
[SYS1.SYSEXE]QMAN$QUEUE_MANAGER.DMP;1
-ANALDISK-I-BAD_DIRFIDSEQ, invalid file sequence number in directory file ID
%ANALDISK-W-LINKCOUNT, file (17596,23,0) TCPIP$FTP_RUN.LOG;159
linkcount set at 1 when it should be 0
%ANALDISK-W-LINKCOUNT, file (17689,24636,0) SYS$QUEUE_MANAGER.QMAN$JOURNAL;1
linkcount set at 1 when it should be 0
%ANALDISK-W-LOSTHEADER, file (17596,23,0) TCPIP$FTP_RUN.LOG;159
not found in a directory
%ANALDISK-W-LOSTHEADER, file (17689,24636,0) SYS$QUEUE_MANAGER.QMAN$JOURNAL;1
not found in a directory
%ANALDISK-W-FREESPADRIFT, free block count of 18902224 is incorrect (RVN 1);
the correct value is 18902304
26 REPLIES
Volker Halle
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

IFX,

multiple allocated block are most dangerous, as this means that certain LBNs belong to different files. To recover, you will need to most certainly delete BOTH files affected and run ANAL/DISK/REPAIR again.

If you can, shut down the system, boot from CD, make a physical backup of that disk and then try to repair it using ANAL/DISK/REPAIR, deleting files with MULTALLOC blocks.

Note that when you run ANAL/DISK on a mounted and busy disk, certain errors can show up intermittently. You need to run ANAL/DISK again and only care about those errors, that show up all the time.

Volker.
RBrown_1
Trusted Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

I am not up to V8.3 yet, but this is how it looks to me:

1. It is hard to run analyze/disk on the system disk because it is so active. If you need to analyze the disk_structure on the system disk, you probably need to boot from another disk to get less confusing results.

2. Of the files listed, the only one I noticed that I would worry about was DCLTABLES.EXE. Check in SYS$SYSTEM and make sure that there is a higher-numbered version than any of the ones marked for delete. If there is not, then you will want to get one from somewhere.

3. In RSX-11M you could reset the marked-for-delete bit on a file so that it would not be deleted after all. As near as I can tell, analyze/disk in VMS does not offer this functionality.
Volker Halle
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

DCLTABLES.EXE files marked for delete typically show up after layered product installations or updates, which modify the current DCLTABLES. The installation procedure will do a INSTALL REPALCE DCLTABLES and then PURGE, but many processes still have the old DCLTBALES opn, so they will be marked for delete.

$ ANAL/DISK/REPAIR will happily clean up those marked-for-delete file headers.

Volker.
Hoff
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

How much do you trust your system disk BACKUP and your ability to recover your disk? If you don't, then address that matter regardless.

And while you're addressing that, re-run ANALYZE /DISK /REPAIR from your distribution disk or from another system disk (after making the disk BACKUP /IMAGE copy), and see what happens with the structure of this disk. Most of the stuff is innocuous, but a few of those errors could be more serious.
Guenther Froehlin
Valued Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

First before "fixing" anything run ANALYZE/DISK again with the /LOCK qualifier. Then let's look at the list again. Without /LOCK or /REPAIR you can get misleading information on an active disk.

And PLEEEEEEEEASE collapse your listing a bit by removing nearly identical lines before posting it.

/Guenther
Jon Pinkley
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

Files marked for delete aren't necessarily bad, it just is an indication that the file was open when it was deleted, and it was never closed before the disk was dismounted. The system disk is the one most likely to have those types of files.

Multiply allocated blocks are BAD. They should never occur if the rules are followed, unless there is a hardware problem, a bug in kernel mode code, or improper use of privilege, for example, physical or logical I/O to the disk.

Was this system disk connected to a shared bus and possibly mounted by two systems that were not in a properly configured cluster? That is probably the most common cause of multiply allocated blocks, as there are multiple systems that each think they have total knowledge of what blocks are available for use.

So, make sure you don't have the possibility of a partitioned cluster, and don't allow two non-clustered systems to simultaneously mount the disk (at least in a writeable condition). Booting a system from a CD/DVD upgrade disc and then mounting an active system disk is another example of uncoordinated mounted disks.

The point is, if you don't fix the cause of the problem, then any work you do to fix it will be a waste of time, since you will have more multiply allocated blocks again very quickly.

Good Luck,

Jon
it depends
Robert Gezelter
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

IFX,

I concur with my colleagues. Running ANALYZE against an active system disk can produce many results, not all of which are significant.

If the system in question is up on a 7x24 basis, where downtime is a serious issue there are some steps one can take to better understand what is happening.

For example, if the system disk is shadowed/mirrored, one can create an additional block-level copy of the device, then disconnect the extra (scratch) copy. Re-mount the scratch copy privately. Now run ANALYZE against it. You will see some things, but I would not be surprised to see the problems with the highest concern (e.g., multiply allocated blocks) disappear from the list. If that happens you will have assurance that the problem is caused by the disk being active while ANALYZE was running.

- Bob Gezelter, http://www.rlgsc.com
IFX_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

Thanks to all for the inputs. Fortunately, there is a scheduled maintenance on this system which I can make use of to carry out the suggestions.

I'm currently running a backup on the system disk. A couple of hours from now, I'm going to shutdown the system and boot from CD and run analyze/disk and repair on one shadow set member. But before running the repair, I'm going to disable shadowing first just to make sure.
IFX_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

I have deleted the erroneous files as suggested. However, after running analyze/disk/repair there are still reference to certain files without the filenames. How can these errors be removed?


Analyze/Disk_Structure/Repair for _$1$DGA4995: started on 10-SEP-2008 16:04:41.20

%ANALDISK-I-OPENQUOTA, error opening QUOTA.SYS
-SYSTEM-W-NOSUCHFILE, no such file
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17665,14,0)
y _⠬⠬ y ⠬ y
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 66369 to 66480
LBN 7930688 to 7930799, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17091,2,0) à ê o⠬à Ž o⠬ Ž
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 7345 to 7456
LBN 7930688 to 7930799, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â â Ÿ⠬0â â O⠬àÿx â ¬P y oâ ¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110097 to 110112
LBN 7931056 to 7931071, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17160,1,0)  à ⠬ ⠬ à ⠬ ⠬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 4465 to 4480
LBN 7931056 to 7931071, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â â Ÿ⠬0â â O⠬àÿx â ¬P y oâ ¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110129 to 110144
LBN 7931088 to 7931103, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17160,1,0)  à ⠬ ⠬ à ⠬ ⠬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 4481 to 4496
LBN 7931088 to 7931103, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â â Ÿ⠬0â â O⠬àÿx â ¬P y oâ ¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110145 to 110160
LBN 7931104 to 7931119, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â â Ÿ⠬0â â O⠬àÿx â ¬P y oâ ¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 111761 to 111776
LBN 7931104 to 7931119, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â â Ÿ⠬0â â O⠬àÿx â ¬P y oâ ¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110161 to 110192
LBN 7931120 to 7931151, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â â Ÿ⠬0â â O⠬àÿx â ¬P y oâ ¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110977 to 111008
LBN 7931120 to 7931151, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â â Ÿ⠬0â â O⠬àÿx â ¬P y oâ ¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 111025 to 111040
LBN 7931168 to 7931183, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17393,3,0) Â y â ¬P y /â ¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 1552225 to 1552240
LBN 7931168 to 7931183, RVN 1
Wim Van den Wyngaert
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

With DFU you can find the file name.

E.g. DFU search dev: /fid=17665

Don't know why we don't get the file name. Must be old software and HP prefers to implement new stuff.

Wim
Wim
IFX_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

DFU was not able to find the files as well.

I also ran DFU verify/fix but it was not able to fix the errors too.
Oswald Knoppers_1
Valued Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

Which version of DFU are you using. Older versions of DFU can cause MULTALLOC problems in certain circumstances.

Oswald
Jur van der Burg
Respected Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

In general, neither analyze/disk nor dfu can fix multalloc errors. They can't read your mind about which file to delete.

multalloc means that you have a serious problem with the integrity of the disk structure, and that two or more files have the same logical blocks allocated to them. So you have to delete at least one of them, but you can't be sure which one. I would be very careful with this, and preferably reinstall vms on a new volume. Or do manual recovery, but then you REALLY have to know what you do.

Jur.
IFX_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

Oswald,
I'm using DFU v3.2. As suggested above, I tried using it to search for other files based on file id.

Jur,
Thanks to the early responses, I have already deleted most of the errant files and has significantly the reduced the disk errors. Now, aside from quickly jumping into performing a re-installation of the OS, I need your 'expert' thoughts on how to delete/deal with the remaining errant files.
Jon Pinkley
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

IFX,

What event let you to run analyze disk in the first place?

We know you have a shadow set with errors, but we don't know how many members are in the shadow set, and how the members are connected to the system. Do any of the members have direct connections to multiple systems? By that I mean are any of the shadow set members connected to either a shared storage bus (shared SCSI bus, Fibre Channel. CI or DSSI)? I see your last analyze output was for a FC DG device. What type of Fibre Channel controller do you have (MSA, EVA, XP, HSG80, something else)? Was (at least) one of the shadow set members ever presented to more than one system that were not part of the same cluster?

Can you please give us a bit of information about your hardware/software configuration?

Can you do the following?

$ define/job DFU$NOSMG T ! disable the pesky SMG interface
$ dfu report $1$DGA4995:

Cut and paste the output into notepad, save as a .txt file and attach to the comment. This output will provide the info we need to be able to have you dump out the blocks of indexf.sys that contain the file headers of these files. It is possible that something has overwritten parts of the indexf.sys file.

If you go back to your original posting, you will see that the first errors are reporting files marked for delete, but then there is a block of 14 contiguous file headers (may not be contiguous on disk, but probably are) that have %ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER. These for the headers from 17711 to 17724

I will reproduce the first and last one, see the first message for the rest.

%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17711,24624,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-FIDNUM_ZERO, file number zero but not a valid deleted header
-ANALDISK-I-INVHEADER_BUSY, invalid file header marked "busy"
in index file bitmap

...

%ANALDISK-W-BADHEADER, file (17724,0,0)
invalid file header
-ANALDISK-I-IDLEHEADER_BUSY, idle file header marked "busy"
no user action necessary

This is the portion of the indexf.sys file that I think had a good chance of being overwritten. We can't determine what to dump without knowing more about the disk, and that is reported in the output of dfu report. (The line "First header VBN" is the most important, but unless there is something sensitive in the output, please provide the complete report.

Jon
it depends
IFX_1
Frequent Advisor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

Jon,

*** What event let you to run analyze disk in the first place?

I ran analyze/disk on the system when I encountered the following errors upon accessing the audit journal.

%AUDSRV-W-BADRECORD, invalid data in record 184669
%RMS-F-IRC, illegal record encountered; VBN or record number = 169176


*** Do any of the members have direct connections to multiple systems? By that I mean are any of the shadow set members connected to either a shared storage bus (shared SCSI bus, Fibre Channel. CI or DSSI)? Was (at least) one of the shadow set members ever presented to more than one system that were not part of the same cluster?

We are using EMC storage on a two-node ES40 cluster which has common system disk. Most of the shadow sets (including the system disk) have two members. The system is now up with only one volume ($1$DGA899). I'm running the DFU and analyze/disk/repair on the 2nd member, $1$DGA4995 which I mounted privately.

Most of the errant files that showed in my original posting were created at the time when HP tried to configure the second node in the cluster. I recall some problems were encountered that time and I believe it connected to the common system disk as a separate node which may have caused these errors.


*** Can you do the following?
$ define/job DFU$NOSMG T ! disable the pesky SMG interface
$ dfu report $1$DGA4995:

Pls refer to attached dfu report.


Much thanks for the help.
Jon Pinkley
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

"Most of the errant files that showed in my original posting were created at the time when HP tried to configure the second node in the cluster. I recall some problems were encountered that time and I believe it connected to the common system disk as a separate node which may have caused these errors."

I would think twice before inviting them back for system upgrades.

I would not trust anything on the disk. You did see some of the effects when you analyzed the audit file. There are probably other errors you are not yet aware of, and these errors are being copied to your system backups. Hopefully you still have a backup from prior to the addition of the second node. If you do have backups from prior to the event, write protect them and keep them safe. You may need them to restore data files from.

You even have multiply allocated blocks in the same file (17670,16,0)

%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â??â?? à ¸â?¬0â? â?? Oâ?¬à à ¿x â?¬P y oâ?¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110161 to 110192
LBN 7931120 to 7931151, RVN 1
%ANALDISK-W-MULTALLOC, file (17670,16,0) 0â??â?? à ¸â?¬0â? â?? Oâ?¬à à ¿x â?¬P y oâ?¬
multiply allocated blocks
VBN 110977 to 111008
LBN 7931120 to 7931151, RVN 1

Here LBN 7931120 to 7931151 are mapped to VBN 110161 to 110192 and mapped again to VBN 110977 to 111008, both in the same file (17670,16,0).

If you run the DFU report and look for "first header VBN", take that number, subtract one (the first file number is 1, not 0), then add the file number of a file you want to dump the header of (for example 17670 for the file with file id (17670,16,0). This will give the VBN of [000000]INDEXF.SYS that has the file header for the file.

Since on your $1$DGA4995:, the First header VBN is 827, to dump the file headers, add 826 to the file number, and dump that block of [000000]indexf.sys

For example to dump the header of the file that has the same LBNs mapped twice, (17670,16,0), dump VBN 18496 (17670+826) of [000000]indexf.sys

$ dump/file_header/block=(start:18496,count:1) $1$DGA4995:[000000]indexf.sys

or to see it in hex/ascii format

$ dump/block=(start:18496,count:1) $1$DGA4995:[000000]indexf.sys

Look at the retrieval pointers and you will see that the same LBNs are mapped more than once.

Example: (much left out for brevity), see attachment for full details.

$ dfu report disk$user1
...
First header VBN : 998
,,,
$ dir login.com;/file

Directory ROOT$USERS:[JON]

LOGIN.COM;241 (340977,27,0)

Total of 1 file.
$ vbn = (998-1)+340977
$ sho sym vbn
VBN = 341974 Hex = 000537D6 Octal = 00001233726
$ dump/file/block=(start:341974,count:1) disk$user1:[000000]indexf.sys

Dump of file DSA1200:[000000]INDEXF.SYS;1 on 10-SEP-2008 21:08:12.46
File ID (1,1,0) End of file block 444376 / Allocated 801008

Virtual block number 341974 (000537D6), 512 (0200) bytes

Header area
...
File identification: (340977,27,0)
...
Identification area
File name: LOGIN.COM;241
...
$

If you use dump without /file_header, it will dump the contents of the file header in a hex dump instead of formatting it as a file header.

$ dump/block=(start:341974,count:1) disk$user1:[000000]indexf.sys/width=80

You may be able to see some clues in the ascii text if some other file got mapped over that portion of indexf.sys.

Good luck (you will need it),

Jon
it depends
Jur van der Burg
Respected Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

>Most of the errant files that showed in my >original posting were created at the time >when HP tried to configure the second node in >the cluster.

Right, so there probably has been a partitioned cluster. Someone clearly did not know enough about clusters.

I would for sure toss this disk and rebuild it or restore a backup from before the event as you don't know which blocks are corrupt. You may very well run into subtile (or not so subtile) issues later on. And as said by Jon, don't let these people touch your system ever again.

Jur.
Oswald Knoppers_1
Valued Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

With DFU V3.2 the MULTALLOC problem was fixed.
Robert Gezelter
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

IFX,

Thank you for the additional information. I would recommend EXTREME caution. I agree with both Jon and Jur that the contents of this volume cannot be trusted. While the files that were clearly multiply allocated are now fixed, that is not to say that there were files overwritten by now extinct files created by the second, un-coordinated system.

The simplest recovery plan would be to restore a backup from before the event. More complex plans are possible.

Recovering from such an incident can be very complex, depending on precisely what happened while the disk was being processed outside of proper cluster operation. Coming up with a recovery plan (not just hints of possible issues) is far beyond what is wise in a forum such as this.

If a full restore is not obviously an acceptable option, one should seriously consider outside senior level OpenVMS expertise at this point. [Disclosure: We do provide services in this area, as do several other regular contributors to this forum].

- Bob Gezelter, http://www.rlgsc.com
Robert Gezelter
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

To all,

The OP for this thread did not mention the presence of a defragmenting utility in this situation.

Upon re-reading the comments in my last posting, I realize that a comment on damage control, partitioned clusters, and defragmenters is appropriate.

Note that ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE only knows about where files are NOW, not where they were in the past. There are many truly severe, dare I say frightening, possibilities that can occur when a volume is shared for write between two systems that are not part of a properly formed cluster.

In short, the more allocation or movement activity on such a disk the more serious the situation is. If files (e.g., executables) were being moved while such a situation was in progress, the result is far more serious than will appear from an ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE run after the event.

I do not intend to be alarmist, but EXTREME CAUTION is called for. In other words, a clean ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE only guarantees that the structures are consistent AT THE TIME THAT ANALYZE WAS RUN. There are no guarantees of what is within the files.

- Bob Gezelter, http://www.rlgsc.com
Willem Grooters
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

I would consider the disk corrupted and to be handled that way. Discard the contents and restore from backup.

ANALYZE/DISK is only checking the structure of the file system. In other words: it checked whether INDEXF.SYS (which includes the location and allocation of each file on disk, and the allocation bitmap(s), and, as Rob correctly stated: at the time the test was run.
It does NOT check the consistence of each file. Even if it did not return any errors any more, I would still be worried for internal corereuption of files.
You will have a number of indexed files on this disk: SYSUAF, RIGHSLIST and (IIRC) the TCPIP configuration files, if applicable. You will have quite a lot of sequential files (as each exe will be one). Some files will be damaged, withou you knowing it.
Running such an image may crash the system, or cause havoc in other files.

You may run a check on each file, especially the indexed files, using ANALYZE/RMS, to show any damage there.

BTW: ANY such test on a disk should be done with private, read-only access.
Willem Grooters
OpenVMS Developer & System Manager
Robert Gezelter
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

Willem,

As I am sure was intended, ANALYZE/RMS is subject to the same limitation as ANALYZE/DISK_STRUCTURE, namely both programs only audit the structures, not the contents (that would be an improvement to ANALYZE/RMS, admittedly a run-time and IO intensive one, to verify that the indices actually reflect the records themselves, sort of a /VERIFY_KEYS option).

The short summary of this situation is that EXTREME caution is called for. The precise response depends upon what is on the system disk in question and how valuable it is or how difficult to re-create.

- Bob Gezelter, http://www.rlgsc.com
Jon Pinkley
Honored Contributor

Re: System disk errors when running "analyze/disk"

By far the simplest solution is to restore from a known good backup. That may be unacceptable if that backup was from 3 months ago, and there are other data files on the disk. Any changes to things like SYSUAF.DAT would be lost as well, so users may need use an old password to gain access, etc.

A "merge" of data is possible, but as stated by other, you really need to KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING.

People make mistakes. Even people with knowledge and experience make mistakes, although hopefully with much lower frequency.

If a cup of sand from a sandblaster got into you car engine while it was being overhauled, would you expect the mechanic to continue as if nothing had happened?

Some mistakes require immediate attention, and some don't. Part of experience is knowing which mistakes are bad enough to cause the abandonment of the work since the last know good state. With high probability, the cost of falling back to the previous backup immediately upon discovery of the problem at the time the upgrade was being done, would have been lower than the cost of recovery at this time.

Jon
it depends