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calculating transfer size on vms disk

 
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mark_511
Occasional Advisor

calculating transfer size on vms disk

how can I calculate the transfer size on a vms disk. Required for setting chunksize on RAID set. I need to find what the average transfer size is to the current drive.
14 REPLIES
Ian Miller.
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

on current version of VMS see
SHOW MEM/CACHE/FULL
____________________
Purely Personal Opinion
mark_511
Occasional Advisor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

Yes, tried this first but lists x Block IO. What does "Block IO" refer to in this context
labadie_1
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

Until recently, most of the I/O made were of less than 16K.

$ monitor disk/item=all

gives the queue length and the I/O operation rate. If you find how many I/O your model of disk gives when it has a queue length of 1 (for example), then it will be quite easy.
Check the specs of your disk.
Wim Van den Wyngaert
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

Performace advisor can give you the IO size per program.

Wim
Wim
mark_511
Occasional Advisor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

no, sho cache gives me what I need but I require clarification of what the "Block IO" refers to. Is it Bytes, Blocks (if so what size), K?
Wim Van den Wyngaert
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

Current setting of the system parameter
VCC_MAX_IO_SIZE in blocks.
The extended file cache (XFC) will only cache files up to this size.

So it is blocks and for all IO's bigger than 127 blocks there are no statistics.

Wim
Wim
Wim Van den Wyngaert
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

And show mem is not per disk.

PA can give you the IO size per disk.

Wim
Wim
Wim Van den Wyngaert
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

And the block is 512 bytes.

What can you do with sh mem/cac/fu ?
Wim
Ian Miller.
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

"What does "Block IO" refer to in this context"

Consider this Example.

Transfer Size: Reads Read Hits Writes
1 Block IO: 1339139 1224267 624906
2 Block IO: 87599172 77137023 616565
3 Block IO: 6046985 5196849 181878

This saying there has been 1339139 read requests for reads of 1 512 byte block.
There has been 87599172 Reads for 2 blocks
There has been 6046985 reads for 3 blocks.

From this sort of data you can determine the most frequently requested size of read or write on your system. If you take this data and paste it into a spreadsheet you can plot histograms, calculate averages etc
____________________
Purely Personal Opinion
Wim Van den Wyngaert
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

But not per disk.

Wim
Wim
Wim Van den Wyngaert
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

And are the IO's bybassing the cache in it ?
Wim
Keith Parris
Trusted Contributor
Solution

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

Another way to calculate average transfer size is to look at it down at the controller level. If you have HSx controllers, VTDPY can give you, on a per-disk basis, the average data transfer rate and the I/O request rate. Dividing the average request rate into the average data transfer rate in kilobytes gives you the average I/O tramsfer size in kilobytes.
Hein van den Heuvel
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

Ok folks, enough chatting about block sizes and caches. Let's get back to be basic question which is NOT calculating the transfer size as the subject suggestm, but it is figuting out an optimal chuk size for a raid set.

None of the prior replies are going to help with that.

IMHO are stuck by picking a highish number like 255 or 256. High enough to avoid excessive splitting of IO, low enough to pread hotspots.

It is exceedingly unliky that you can actually pick a hardware stripe size to optimally match your average IO size.

The AVERAGE is completely irrelevant in this calculation IMnsHO.
Only the MODAL value counts (or whatever the name of the statistical term that means 'most often used' :-). This is because a lot of VMS IOs are 1 blocks. For those the chunk size does not matter at all, but they do influence the average!

This is one of the few times where you may want to take the DISK ALLOCATION CLUSTER SIZE into consideration. Why? because you know there is a good chance that IOs will start as a cluster boundary. After all, every single file starts at a cluster boundary.

So by selecting the chunk size to be a straight multiple of the cluster size you will make sure that the first IO from the beginning of a file will not be spilt over chunks.

The following IOs are dependend on the IO sizes. For sequential files IO that is OFTEN, but not always 32 blocks. (SHOW/SET RMS!)So to keep those from fragmenting you could consider
CLUSTERSIZE = N * 32
CHUNKSIZE = N * CLUSTERSIZE

An other popular IO access pattens is Indexed file IO. There the size is BUCKETSIZE, but the first datablock (by default) tend to start at block 3 or 4, and does NOT start on a multiple of cluster no bucket size. Note, blocks intentt will be alligned, and you can play fdl games to start out aligned.

I'd pick 256 if I had some hope to force allignment on 2**N boundaries. I'd pick 255 if i was afraid to 'fall out of sync' and cause a pattern of splits. With the chunk size being prime you'll distribute the pain evenly :-).

hope this helps,
Hein.
Hein van den Heuvel
Honored Contributor

Re: calculating transfer size on vms disk

[ 0 points for this reply ]

I'm glad you like my reply (judging by the 10p) despite the horrible spelling. Sorry 'bout that. I just started typing and never looked back.

One cute (imho) line I was going to put in there was "when is the last time you did an 'average' IO?". Just to put further focus on the 'modal' value selections, not median, not average.
4 IOs 1 block
3 IOs 4 blocks
2 IOs 8 blocks
8 IOs 16 blocks.

Total 17 IOs, 160 block, avg=9.4, med=8.5, mod=16. Pick 16 as the number for the sizing, not 9.5.

cheers,
Hein