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Operating System - Tru64 Unix
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LSM : Growing rootvol Possible ?

Srivathsan_2
Advisor

LSM : Growing rootvol Possible ?

Tru64 Unix V5.1B with LSM encapsulated root disk.

Two questions :

1. Any ways to grow rootvol without having contiguous free space on the root-disk ?

2. Any ways to resize the AdvFS domain/fileset on a shrinked volume ( any volume , not necessarily root)?

Cheers,
Srivathsan

3 REPLIES
Venkatesh BL
Honored Contributor

Re: LSM : Growing rootvol Possible ?

Reg. 2)
From the manpage of 'volassist',
"Notes

File systems such as AdvFS and UFS cannot currently take advantage of a shrunk volume.

These operations are currently disallowed by default to prevent their incorrect use with an existing AdvFS or UFS file system. To override this default behavior and force the volume to shrink, you must use the -f force option."
Srivathsan_2
Advisor

Re: LSM : Growing rootvol Possible ?

Thanks for that pointer on the man page...

So there is no way to resize the filesystem on a shrunk volume. I tried doing a quotacheck and unmount / mount on the filesystem ( / usr :-( ) but to no avail. System's fine, but on the next reboot i lost my filesystem ( corrupt ).

It was a test system though, still , is there any way to recover from such a scenario ?

Also, i'm thinking what could be the reason for allowing a shrink in volume but not allowing a FS resize ( VxVM has it but LSM doesn't ). Is it only for DB kind of usage of non-filesystem / raw volumes ?

Thanks
Srivathsan
Joris Denayer
Respected Contributor

Re: LSM : Growing rootvol Possible ?

Srivathsan,

For your second question.

This comes from the man page of mount in v5.1b

extend
Allows the file system to make use of expanded space on the underlying
storage device. The -o option can be used on the initial mount of a
file system or by way of the -u update option if the file system is
already mounted. For UFS, if you do not want to mount the file system,
or if you want to take only part of the available storage space, you
can use the extendfs command. See the extendfs(8) reference page for
more information.

There are several steps needed in order to expand a file system:

1. Make additional storage space available on the underlying storage
device (that is, a LSM volume or hardware RAID LUN).

2. For non-LSM volumes, modify the disk label to include additional
storage. See the disklabel reference page for more information.

3. Use the mount command with the extend option to allow the file
system to use the additional storage.

For an unmounted AdvFS fileset, the following is an example of volume
expansion:

# mount -o extend domain#fileset /ausr1

For a mounted AdvFS fileset, the following is an example of volume
expansion:

# mount -u -o extend domain#fileset /ausr2

For an an unmounted UFS file system, the following is an example of
volume expansion:

# mount -o extend /dev/disk/dsk0g /useref

For a mounted UFS file system, the following is an example of volume
expansion:

# mount -u -o extend /dev/disk/dsk0h /useracct

Refer to the System Administration manual for more information.


However, I have no idea if it is supported on the root filesystem


BTW: In normal situations the root_domain is created with the "-r" flag. This will prevent creation of new volumes for the root_domain.

BTW2: Best is to reserve enough place for the root filesystem and mount /tmp on a separate filesystem

Hope this helps
To err is human, but to really faul things up requires a computer