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recommended air temperature for a computer room

A.K.
Frequent Advisor

recommended air temperature for a computer room

What is the recommended air temperature for a computer room that contain around 15 servers from various models D ,A ,R and L class
Is there official docmentation on this matter from HP

Thanks,
10 REPLIES
Rajeev Shukla
Honored Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

What ever be the number of servers try maintaining 17-18 degree celcius.

monasingh_1
Trusted Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

Check their manufacturer oerating temp requiereents.
We maintain room temp at 68-70 deg.
monasingh_1
Trusted Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

Check their manufacturer oerating temp requiereents.
We maintain room temp at 68-70 deg F.
John Poff
Honored Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

Hi,

You can check into the site prep guides for you machines, but with the modern equipment the rule is whatever is comfortable for you is good for your machines.

When I first started at my current job, we had a couple of V-class machines in a small data center. My boss thought it was great to keep things around 58-60 degrees F. People would come in there, laugh, and say things like "I'ts like a meat locker in here!", and then walk out. The problem was that I had to work in there all day. Finally I dug out the site prep guide for the V-class and showed them that the recommended temperature was 68-80 degrees F. I told them they were running it too cold and they finally bumped up the thermostat to a decent temperature.

JP
Rodney Hills
Honored Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

In my opinion- 60-65F would be be adequate. Older mainframes use to overheat pretty easily and wait have problems past 80F. New models could run at the temp without a problem.

What's more important is that it's clean, since dust can accumulate on circuit boards and chips and cause them to overheat and become damaged.

HTH

-- Rod Hills
There be dragons...
Michael Tully
Honored Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

As long as a constant temperature range is kept you servers will be fine.

Check the document from here on L class servers
http://www.docs.hp.com/hpux/onlinedocs/A5191-96021/A5191-96021.html
Anyone for a Mutiny ?
Stefan Farrelly
Honored Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

Ive worked for lots of companies over the year and seen many many different computer rooms and almost all were set to 16-18 degrees C.

Its also important to keep a nice airflow around your server racks. Its all very well having the room temp set low but inside the racks with servers crammed in together it can be a lot lot hotter. Keep some sort of air flow outlet around your server racks to aid their cooling.
Im from Palmerston North, New Zealand, but somehow ended up in London...
Werner Marc Van Goethem
Occasional Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

Although air temperature is important, humidity is too. As far as I can remember it should be around 80% non-condensing.

Regards

Van
Dave Wherry
Esteemed Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

The Site Prep Guide for an rp7410 say:
Temperature
41 - 95 F
5 - 35 C
15 - 80% humidity

I've always tried to keep it in the 70's F and around 40% humidity. As others said, keep it comfortable. You need the humidity to keep static charges down.
As Stefan mentioned, air flow is very important. The systems and racks draw air from the bottom and evacuate it at the top of the rack. Pump the air under the floor and come up through venitlated floor tiles by or under the racks.
Mark Landin
Valued Contributor

Re: recommended air temperature for a computer room

We run between 68-72 and start worrying about things at about 78. Airflow is important, as was mentioned.

You don't want it too cold or you risk some condensation in humid areas. Plus it's just not necessary, so save your electricity (and the environment, and your utility bills!)