ProCurve / ProVision-Based
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

2 VLAN's on Multiple Switches

SOLVED
Go to solution
EMT911inWI
Occasional Visitor

2 VLAN's on Multiple Switches

Good morning, I am in need of some assistance in configuring a second HP2910al switch I have added to my domain. Currently we are running (1) HP2910al switch with 2 VLAN's configured, one primary which is for our current network (the zero) network and one for our Shoretel Phone system (the five) network. We want to add an additional HP2910al switch to the configuration so that we can add more phones. 

I have succesfully stacked the 2 switches setting the first one as the commander and the newly added switch as a member and assigned that new switch an IP on the (zero) network. Can anyone help guide me on what I need to do next to carry those VLAN's over to the new switch. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am new to the whole VLAN world as well as stacking.

4 REPLIES
parnassus
Honored Contributor

Re: 2 VLAN's on Multiple Switches

Have you interconnected both Switches by deploying a "Management Stacking" link between them (I ask that because "Commander" is a typical word used when deploying a Management Stack of Switches...it's not used when a Port Trunking is configured) or are you referring to a Port Trunking *made*not*for*management*purposes* (but made through a single link or through aggregated links) between the two?

If the interconnection approach you followed was the second (Port Trunking: single or aggregated links, it doesn't matter) - I think you didn't that - then what you just need is permitting your VLANs to flow through the Trunk (and then configuring those VLANs on the second added Switch).

If the interconnection approach you followed was the first (Management Stacking) you're following the wrong route...Management Stacking is used primarily to semplify management of multiple Switches by creating a sort of Cluster of manageable ones all controlled by a Master one (the one with the Commander role)...that method is not (and should not be) used to deploy a (port) trunk between them.

EMT911inWI
Occasional Visitor

Re: 2 VLAN's on Multiple Switches

Wow, ok I want to make sure I am using correct terminology. Basically, I put the new switch online and it connected it to an existing port on the primary switch. I then went into the "stacking" option on the primary switch and gave it the commander role. I then selected the "stacking" option on the new switch and gave it the member role. The only physical connection between the 2 switches is that I am connected with an ethernet cable from one empty port of the first switch to an empty port on the second switch. I assume I am doing this incorrectly? I am able to view both switches under the "stack view" on the primary switch and the second switch is able to communicate on the "primary VLAN" but does not work with our phones since it does not have the Shoretel (5 network) VLAN setup on it. I hope this clarifies things. I am truly sorry, I am really new to stacking and VLANS.

 

parnassus
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: 2 VLAN's on Multiple Switches

Don't worry...and no sorry...OK, from what you described, you deployed a Management Stacking [*], basically you stacked both Switch together (interconnecting them via a single link) to be able to manage them centrally (using the Commander one to manage the other members).

So you deployed a Management Stack in the right way.

Management Stacking is - IMHO - not what you need to expand your Switching capacity to support IP Phones and Hosts on the new Switch you added (you can live without Management Stacking and continue to manage your two Switches singularly without particular issues, it's a useful feature but it's not essential).

IMHO you need to deploy "Port Trunking": Port Trunking is described on Chapter 4 here for the HP ProCurve 2910 al Switch Series (it will be very easy to found other references googling around or simply searching through the HPE Community for the same subject).

To said the whole truth you don't even need an aggregated trunk made through Port Trunking (is not mandatory to work with multiple links aggreated together, but it's nice): you simply need just a link with the (logical if LAG, physical if a single port is used) port type set to "Trunk" and then you need to permit all required VLAN IDs you have (or just some) to flow on that logical/physical port in order for the VLANs to overcome the trunk boundary (on both sides).

The fact you can *eventually* aggregate more physical ports together results in a Port Trunk based on a LAG (Link Aggregation Group <- that's a logical entity, not a real physical port...but - remember - the LAG is made of physical ports aggregated together), a LAG is generally used because it adds resiliency and provides enhanced bandwidth (throughput) for the traffic flowing between your two Switches...again...it's not strictly necessary because just a one Port-to-Port link should suffice (exactly as you did to deploy "Management Stacking").

If I were you I will read Chapter 4 and then reserve - just to start - two ports per Switch...those two ports will become part of the newly created LAG (for Port Trunk)...once you defined the LAG with its two members physical ports you also decided which type of link aggregation strategy to use for the LAG (Static = called Trunk ...ouch this word is overused...*or* Dynamic = called LACP). Once the LAG is completely defined you just need to permit the VLANs on it (VLAN 1 is permitted by default), do that on both sides and then connect one cable at time (let's say: cable from port 23 to port 23, cable from port 24 to port 24 if ports 23 and 24 - on both sides - are set to be part of their respective LAGs).

Don't know if Management Stacking can coexist with Port Trunking...but you should only really care about Port Trunking.

Eventually if you don't want to follow the LAG way...do a simple port-to-port link but set that physical port type as type "Trunk" on both ends (normally a port is set as Access type of Hybrid type, not Trunk type).

[*] Stack Management: Uses a single IP address and standard network cabling stack to manage a group (up to 16) of switches in the same IP subnet (broadcast domain), resulting in a reduced number of IP addresses and simplified manage ment of small workgroups for scaling your network to handle increased bandwidth demand.

EMT911inWI
Occasional Visitor

Re: 2 VLAN's on Multiple Switches

Awesome information! Thank you so much. I now have a starting point to go off of. I will update once I have read Chapter 4 and attempt to implement my new found knowledge. Thanks again.