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HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

 
mehtaman123
Visitor

HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

Hi All,

 

To cut a long story short, a number of servers were sent using a well known courier company, on arrival we were informed that the servers were heavily damaged.

 

The most shocking damage was to see the entire server chassis has been bent/bowed.

 

I was wondering what sort of force it would take to cause this sort of damage (image attached).

 

P.S. the servers were well padded and in a double layer box.

 

 

Thanks

8 REPLIES
Trygve Henriksen
Respected Contributor

Re: HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

That chassis is very strong. I would guess that they dropped it 3' or more down onto something solid in order to do this kind of damage. (I note that the picture shows the server upside down. Was it shipped like that, or is it just a coincidence?)

 

In all my years as a server man, I have never managed to do a tenth the damage as seen on that server...

 

 

Also, Thread hijacking is a big no no.

mehtaman123
Visitor

Re: HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

Hi, thanks for the reply...

The server was packaged with a 'This Way Up' and 'Fragile' sticker, the picture was just taken upside down.

We cannot understand how it is even possible to do such damage; all the edges of the servers are bent/cracked, even though they were well padded.

The courier company are being rather awkward as well, stating it is the sender’s responsibility.

I just had to find out what could cause this sort of damage as google'ing did not come up with anything close to the damage we have on the server.
It has clearly been dropped, crushed, driven over and tossed about with a lot of force.

Hopefully we can get an insurance settlement from the courier.
Dennis Handly
Acclaimed Contributor

Re: HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

>I was wondering what sort of force it would take to cause this sort of damage

 

And visible damage to the box?  Any semi truck tire prints?  :-)

How many bubbles were popped of the bubble wrap?

mehtaman123
Visitor

Re: HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

The boxes did not look too damaged on the outside - there was the odd crease but no cuts in the cardboard.

I was hoping for some obvious tyre tracks to send back to the courier... no such luck unfortunately.

 

All the bubbles would have been popped in frustration by now.

 

Dave73
Regular Advisor

Re: HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

Are they second hand servers ?  I see the server railings are attached to the server.

anthony11
Regular Advisor

Re: HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

Brand new dl36p gen8 systems come from the factory looking this way.
mehtaman123
Visitor

Re: HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

The servers were part of an internal business transfer (London office moved to Hong Kong) so I guess they are classed as second hand.

 

It doesn't surprised me that new servers end up like this as well. It's clear that couriers are not capable of shipping 30kg metal boxes safely.

anthony11
Regular Advisor

Re: HP Proliant DL380 G5 SAS - How much force would it take to bend the chassis

>The servers were part of an internal business transfer (London office >moved to Hong Kong) so I guess they are classed as second hand.

>It doesn't surprised me that new servers end up like this as well. It's clear >that couriers are not capable of shipping 30kg metal boxes safely.


They were shipped transcontinental?  I would think that given the shipping costs, customs nightmares and delays, and overall hassle factor that acquiring new in HK or just using remotely would have been easier, especially given that the subject describes crufty old G5 systems.  I demo'd a G5 system once and rejected it.  PCI cards attached to the chassis lid, no functional serial console, worthless iLO.

 

Re carriers being capable of shipping safely -- for all the complaints I have about HP (or Sun for that matter) I haven't had an issue (yet) with a system being damaged when shipped in original packaging.  I re-read the OP and looked at the photo.  "P.S. the servers were well padded and in a double layer box"

 

Shipping isn't just (or necessarily) about padding, it's about immobilization and isolation.

 

 Look at how systems come from the factory:  slab-shaped box with a framework of packaging that a) keeps the chassis from flopping around and b) provides a few inches of space between the chassis and the box walls.  The former addresses rough handling; the latter most punctures short of impalement on Mitt Romney's pointy head.

 

Now look at the photo above.  some random, shallow box.  I see only a wad of bubble wrap for packaging, and only on one side.  Even if the wrap was originally all around the chassis, this is not remotely adequate packaging for shipping across town, not to mention across the world.  Factory packaging holds the chassis immobile, and fits perfectly into the box, which also serves to support the box from the inside.  Wrapping something heavy in bubble wrap and stuffing it into a random box will always result in the box deforming under stress eg. having anything stacked on top, or the box rolled onto its side. Note how the corners in the photo are rounded? Bubble wrap is among the most-misused things around, second perhaps only to "effect" as a verb.  It's good for keeping *lightweight* items immobilized within a rigid container, or from banging against each other.  It's worthless for anything heavy, to which it's merely slightly-thickened air.

 

The shallowness of the box also provides no isolation - non-severe jabs and punctures contact the server rather than stopping inches short.  Stuffing a 1U server into the same box with the 2U server pictured actually would have protected both better than bubble wrap.