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PIII performance vs P4's in Proliant servers, and disk cloning.

Al_56
Regular Advisor

PIII performance vs P4's in Proliant servers, and disk cloning.

Hi hardware guru's,

I'm going to need 8 - 10 servers for web serving, and l was wondering whether there was a big performance increase from the Pentium III 1.26 ghz proc to the P4 2.66? (l can get 12 P III servers cheaper than 8 P4's, hence the question ;-)

l know that the MHZ for the P4's do not indicate true performance benefits over the P III's and l was wondering if anyone has used both types in the same servers, who can shed some light on the performance gains (if any).

Also, l don't really want the cdroms, is it easy to load an OS (RedHat 7.3 Linux in this case), via the network? Or is there a better way?

These servers will all be clones (identically configured hardware and software). Which methods have people used successfully to clone Linux machines?

Thanks in advance.
1 REPLY
Alzhy
Honored Contributor

Re: PIII performance vs P4's in Proliant servers, and disk cloning.

You mentioned just "web serving" -- it depends. If you're web serving does not involve a lot of server-based cpu crunching -- ie. PHP then the PIII's will suffice. But to be on the "safe side" and if the $$ difference is not that significant -- go for the P4.. Clock speed still matters for number crunching specially if serving highly dynamic content and server-based routines (CGI/PHP...)...

Yes it is possible to install Linux via LAN -- I think it is called Kickstart on Redhat Linux... You can also consider cloning the disk using dd/LVM...
Hakuna Matata.