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Last Question? Account Admin

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Paul Stanard
Regular Advisor

Last Question? Account Admin

I want to create an account for myself with root privileges. Which group should I place myself in to allow for that? system? I think I need a UID/run level 0.
4 REPLIES
Michael Schulte zur Sur
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: Last Question? Account Admin

Hi,

you could create an account with userid and groupid=0, this would be a copy of root.
You don't want to use root itself?
There is also an interesting programme called sudo, which lets you run commands as root, even though not root. You find it here:
http://www.courtesan.com/sudo/sudo.html

However I wouldn't be able to help you on the configuration.

Michael
Ann Majeske
Honored Contributor

Re: Last Question? Account Admin

There is only one account with root privileges, and that's "root" :) Putting yourself in the system group will allow you to do some things, but not everything.

There are several ways people handle it when several people need to do some or all of the things that need root privileges.

"sudo" has already been mentioned.

"dop" is similar to "sudo" but is distributed as part of the OS, starting in v5.(something). The documentation for "dop"
was in the "Security" guide for versions prior to V5.1B. I don't know where it went in the V5.1B documentation, so it might be easiest to just look at the V5.1A version:
http://h30097.www3.hp.com/docs/base_doc/DOCUMENTATION/V51A_HTML/ARH95DTE/TITLE.HTM
The dop documentation is in appendix G.

If you don't mind giving out the root password to all parties, you can set up a policy where everyone who's using the root account logs in as themselves first and then su's to root. This way you get the accountability in the audit logs of who actually did what, but only as long as everyone plays by the rules.
Ralf Puchner
Honored Contributor

Re: Last Question? Account Admin

if adding your user to the system group you can simple get "root" privileges after using the

su

or

su ~

command. The commands differ, because one of them will also set the root environment during switch, the other only assigns privileges without setting the environment of user "root".

Btw. you should never work with root directly for security reason. Use your normal user account and switch to root for administration via su.
Help() { FirstReadManual(urgently); Go_to_it;; }
Sally Devine
Frequent Advisor

Re: Last Question? Account Admin

You could go into Sysman/Security/Configure DOP and then add yourself to the "SuperUsers" privilege.

SD