Switches, Hubs, and Modems
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

How many devices does YOUR PCM handle?

Preston Gallwas
Valued Contributor

How many devices does YOUR PCM handle?

We've got PCM+ 2.0

We have 350 devices, mostly 2600 series. 60+ wireless access points (mostly wl420's) and a number of 2500's, 2 2800's, and a few 1600's.

In addition, we have approximately 4,000 end nodes, 65 managed subnets.

Of that, discovery is always running, and always alerting us that end nodes are unreachable, flooding our event log.


I was wondering what sort of environments YOU other users out there use PCM in, and if it is comparable in size and scope of our network.

We also run PCM on a VM on a windows 2000 client, and host, that shares a DL360 w/ 2 processors and 4 gb of memory with a netware 6.5 sp 4 OES web server.

4 REPLIES
Devon Dawson
Advisor

Re: How many devices does YOUR PCM handle?

Preston,

Rumor has it that the next release of PCM (PCM 2.1) will contain an option allowing you to disable status events for end-nodes. This will help you regain control over your event log. It should be available sometime in the next month or two and will be a free upgrade for PCM 2.0 customers.

-D
Preston Gallwas
Valued Contributor

Re: How many devices does YOUR PCM handle?

Ive updated to 2.1 and I dotn see this option.
Ted Nguyen
Advisor

Re: How many devices does YOUR PCM handle?

The events can be disabled in PCM2.1 from the globalprops.prp configuration file. You'll need to use Windows WordPad (or some editor other than notepad) to open the globalprops.prp file and add an entry "DisableEndNodeEvents=true" under Discovery\Pollings group and save the file. This will disable device status polling for hosts.

c:\Program Files\Hewlett-Packard\PNM\server\config\globalprops.prp

Example:

Global {
TempDir=data/temp
...
}

Discovery {
...

Pollings {
DisableEndNodeEvents=true
...
}
}

...
}
Preston Gallwas
Valued Contributor

Re: How many devices does YOUR PCM handle?

Awesome, thanks. The other annoyance, though, is that when devices come online typically they generate "excessive broadcast" messages to the syslog which go to that event viewer in some of our switches.