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When to use Trunking

stevef1
Occasional Advisor

When to use Trunking

Hi all, i have a 2 computer rooms with 30 computers in, the computers are spread across 3 switches and a single connection comes from each switch back to the server room HP 4208 switch, this work ok and we dont have problems with it i was thinking of stacking then trunking the switchs is this a good thing to do?
5 REPLIES
OLARU Dan
Trusted Contributor

Re: When to use Trunking

There's an old saying in the IT world, extracted from the experience of many of your foregoers:

If it's working, don't touch it.

What are you looking to achieve with the change? Better performance? Moving LAN active equipment in one wiring closet? What kind of sitches do you have?
OLARU Dan
Trusted Contributor

Re: When to use Trunking

There's an old saying in the IT world, extracted from the experience of many of your foregoers:

If it's working, don't touch it.

What are you looking to achieve with the change? Better performance? Moving LAN active equipment in one wiring closet? What kind of switches do you have?
stevef1
Occasional Advisor

Re: When to use Trunking

Yes i agree with you if it isnâ t broke then donâ t fix it, i was looking to improve the performance and was wondering if setting up a trunk (with 3 ports) may be the answer



Re: When to use Trunking

Trunking, otherwise known as link aggregration serves 2 purposes - increasing capacity and (more importantly in my experience) increasing availability.

I think the availability increase is awesome. iirc there is virtually no reconvergence time unlike using spanning tree to manage redundant links.

OT
I love the old sayings....if it works don't touch it...that is of course until you lose availability that could have been prevented by a simple 5 min configuration.
rick jones
Honored Contributor

Re: When to use Trunking

You should look at the utilization of the inter-switch links.

Trunking will increase the _aggregate_ performance but does not (directly) increase the performance of individual flows. So, aggregation will not in and of itself speed-up say an individual FTP transfer, but it can speed-up a set of concurrent FTP transfers.

You also need to consider the structure of the traffic - is is many to many, many to one, that sort of thing, and then look at the packet scheduling algorithms available in the trunking you would be using - will it schedule frames in the aggregate based on MAC address, or IP, or something else?
there is no rest for the wicked yet the virtuous have no pillows