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which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

i need a solution for 48port-10 Gbe copper switch.can any one suggest me the switch which will support this features......
8 REPLIES
RalphB
Frequent Advisor

Re: which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

There are several options listed here:

www.hp.com/rnd/pdfs/QRG_4AA1-2960ENW.pdf

Toward the end of this web page, at PDF pages 42 and 43, is an 'HP ProCurve Switch Selection Guide', which shows the functionality (L2 vs L3, etc) and number of ports visually.

Also, susing your browser Search function you can search the web page '48' or '48G' or '44' (some of the models have 44 fixed ports plus 4 GBIC ports, which might fit your needs.

Re: which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

Hi,
Thanks for your response,

i am not finding any model which supports 48port-10Gbe copper port.

is there any other option?
if you know which model will support this option pls send the same..

i need to know one more think what is CX4 in HP with part NO J8708A HP 4-port 10GbE CX4 zl Module

J8439A HP X130 CX4 Media Converter

can any one tel me what is the use of this.



Oleg Sukharev
Valued Contributor

Re: which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

ProCurve 8212zl and 5412zl with 12 4-port 10GbE CX4 zl modules (J8708A) will do.

There is one limitation. Bandwidth of connection between module and backplane is 28 gigs. So if you'll use all 4 10G ports of a module, switch will be balancing traffic in port pairs 1-4 and 2-3 sharing 14G in each pair.

Goog product selector: http://h10144.www1.hp.com/products/selector/switches/

More info on 8200zl, 5400zl and modules: http://h20195.www2.hp.com/v2/GetPDF.aspx/4AA0-5388ENW.pdf

HTH,
Oleg
rick jones
Honored Contributor

Re: which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

In the 10 GbE space one needs to be more specific than just "copper." There is CX4, which is a "copper" interconnect spec where one gets transceivers and cables separately, there is DAC (Direct Attach Cable) which is a copper cable with transceivers hardwired to each end, and there is (stilborn thanks to its high power requirements?) RJ45.
there is no rest for the wicked yet the virtuous have no pillows

Re: which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

Thanks for the reply.......

did CX4 module will support RJ45 connection.
for 10Gbe copper only Cx4 is ok or we require any meadia converter(J8439A) is required..

I have prepared BOM for 400 port-1gig,60 port 10Gbe (fiber) & 60 port 10Gbe RJ45 (copper)..the file is attaeched.
can any one tel me that the BOM which i prepared will support the above requirement..

rick jones
Honored Contributor

Re: which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

CX4 is not the same thing as RJ45.
there is no rest for the wicked yet the virtuous have no pillows
John Gelten
Regular Advisor

Re: which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

As Rick pointed out: CX4 is definitely not the same as RJ45. And your BOM contains CX4.
Switches with RJ45-based 10Gb interfaces are quite rare; I have looked at several vendors (ProCurve/H3C, Brocade/Foundry, Cisco, Juniper) sites, and have not been able to find one.
RJ45-interfaces have two major drawbacks: they consume more power compared to CX4 (ca 0.1W vs 5.0W), and the transceiver-latency is considerably larger (ca 0.1ms vs 1.0ms).
You probably want RJ45 because of their pro: larger distances are supported (ca 10m vs 100m)
All 10G-switches seem to support either SFP+ or XFP, and I haven't seem SFP+ to RJ45 transceivers (like there were for 1Gbps SFP)
John Gelten
Regular Advisor

Re: which switch supports 48port -10 Gbe copper.

And a small addition to the warning from Oleg:
As far as I recall, within those pairs of two ports that have to share a 28Gb link to the backplane, one has priority over the other. So if you try to utilize all 4 ports on a 4-port module for the full 10Gbps per port, two ports will be handling 10Gbps per port, and the other two will be limited to 4Gbps per port.
Might not be important in most environments, but it is good to take into account when planning primary and backup interfaces in an STP-topology, for example.