HPE Community read-only access December 15, 2018
This is a maintenance upgrade. You will be able to read articles and posts, but not post or reply.
Hours:
Dec 15, 4:00 am to 10:00 am UTC
Dec 14, 10:00 pm CST to Dec 15, 4:00 am CST
Dec 14, 8:00 pm PST to Dec 15, 2:00 am PST
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

HP-UX

 
Vij_Rdv
Occasional Contributor

HP-UX

Hai folks, 

Anyone explain about term=hp in hp-ux...?

5 REPLIES
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor

Re: HP-UX

It's the default terminal type of HP terminals that were often used with HP-UX servers.

What would you need explained about it?

MK
parnassus
Honored Contributor

Re: HP-UX

@Matti_KurkelaI suspect @Vij_Rdv asked what is the meaning of HP acronym into the HP-UX name (HP Unix name). If so Wikipedia does help (here).

Re: TERM=hp meaning

No, he asked about TERM=hp, that @Matti_Kurkela  explained

Bill Hassell
Honored Contributor

Re: HP-UX

There are two contexts where this string might appear.

1. In /etc/profile (and possibly in $HOME/.profile), this line might appear by itself as part of terminal setup. It would appear as:

TERM=hp

But without any context, it is not possible to define the effect. The hp TERM setting refers to proprietary HP terminals manufactured during the late 1970s (2640a, etc) through the 1990s. Like many ASCII terminals models, they have a number of features beyond plain ASCII that are triggered by special sequences of characters. These features are often used in programs with menus. In HP-UX, the character version of swinstall is a good example. But setting the TERM variable in the environment to a different TERM value (wy30, vt100, tek4012, etc) that doesn't match the terminal being used, the display can be unreadable.

2. If the context for the string TERM=hp appears during a login, it may be coming from a terminal setup program such as ttytype as a result of not getting a recognisable query response from the current terminal (or terminal emulator). 



Bill Hassell, sysadmin
parnassus
Honored Contributor

Re: TERM=hp meaning

Ah...gosh...too simple (TERM vs term).