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OS bit

 
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himacs
Super Advisor

OS bit

Hi Admin,

Please tell what is the exactly meaning of OS bit.

For eg. i have hpux 11iv2 64 bit OS.What is the difference betwenn 32 bit and 64 bit.

Regards
himacs
11 REPLIES
Michal Kapalka (mikap)
Honored Contributor

Re: OS bit

hi,

that the os is running in native 64 bit.

mikap
himacs
Super Advisor

Re: OS bit

Hi mikap,

Thanks for the response.But please explain me that.

Actually my understanding is if OS is 64 bit, datas are transferred as 64 bit each.

Regards
himacs
vishnu.khandare
Respected Contributor

Re: OS bit

Hi,

Please refer below threads

http://forums11.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/questionanswer.do?threadId=988632

http://forums11.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/questionanswer.do?threadId=939289

Hope this solves ur query.

Regards
Vishnu Khandare
You should deserve before U desire!!!!
Michal Kapalka (mikap)
Honored Contributor

Re: OS bit

hi,

i would recommend to read this articles :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HP-UX

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/64-bit

mikap

Re: OS bit

>I have HP-UX 11iv2 64 bit OS. What is the difference between 32 bit and 64 bit?

It is meaningless since all 11.23 & 11.31 kernels are 64 bit.
The important thing is whether your application is 32 or 64 bit. The latter can address more data.
TwoProc
Honored Contributor
Solution

Re: OS bit

I think himacs is asking a more fundamental question.

If the system is a 64 bit one, in general (but not always), it is referring to the address register. And, in that scope, in general, it means that the data registers are at least the same size. Also, in general, it means that that bus sizes are the same as well, although they may/may not be.

In most cases where everything is matched, its going to be on high end processors where the data registers, address registers, the address bus, the data bus, etc. are going to be pretty much the same, in this case 64 bit. In some cases, a piece or two of the above may be larger, though I can't think of one off hand.

In cases where the address register is larger than the data bus, etc. the reason is often a case where a product is being introduced as a method to provide alternate cost (and therefore market) positions.

The cleanest way to consider a system 64 bit would be to think along the lines that you've got 64 bit addressable ram, 64 bit data representation internally in the cpu, and a nice complement of 64 bit hardware to address ram, etc. external to the chip. Having a single element of the above not being true, may not necessarily disqualify the chip or whole architecture from being a 64 bit architecture system.
We are the people our parents warned us about --Jimmy Buffett
Viktor Balogh
Honored Contributor

Re: OS bit

Hi himacs,

Here is how to query the bitness of your system. The following is the mode your HW supports:

# getconf HW_CPU_SUPP_BITS
64

This tells you what modes your HW supports:
( 1 means 64-bit only, 2 means 32-bit only, and 3 means both)

# getconf HW_32_64_CAPABLE
1

This is the mode your kernel supports:

# getconf KERNEL_BITS
64

For the further explanation see the comment of TwoProc above.

Regards,
Viktor
****
Unix operates with beer.
himacs
Super Advisor

Re: OS bit

Hi,

Thanks for the responses.So in 64-bit OS more data can be saved in data register while comparing to 32-bit.And also process execution will be much faster.

Regards
himacs
Patrick Wallek
Honored Contributor

Re: OS bit

>>And also process execution will be much faster.

Not necessarily true. Most 64-bits processors are faster than the older 32-bit, but 64-bit does not always mean faster.

64-bit also allows you to address much more RAM than 32-bit.

Re: OS bit

>Patrick: but 64-bit does not always mean faster.

Right. If you have twice as much data due to the larger pointer/long size, it may be slower.
TwoProc
Honored Contributor

Re: OS bit

Re: faster.

Not unless you're running programs that need 64 bit wide data and access. Otherwise, it's wasted cpu hardware that probably takes up more space in memory and on disk, and uses more energy unecessarily. :-(

We are the people our parents warned us about --Jimmy Buffett