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Orphaned Inodes

Bob Manocchia
Regular Advisor

Orphaned Inodes

I recently had a problem accessing one of my servers. I could get a login prompt and entered my password but could not gain access. I tried the system console to no avail. I cold booted and spotted the following entries in the boot.log:

Sep 28 22:11:59 andover fsck: /dev/vg00/lvol4: Clearing orphaned inode 229382 (uid=518, gid=522, mode=0100600, size=32768)
Sep 28 22:11:59 andover fsck: /dev/vg00/lvol4: Clearing orphaned inode 229385 (uid=1003, gid=1004, mode=040700, size=4096)

Does anyone know what can be do to prevent this in the future.
2 REPLIES
Steven Schweda
Honored Contributor

Re: Orphaned Inodes

If you whack a hung system, and then boot it,
it should not be a surprise if fsck finds a
few things to tidy up. There's no guarantee
that these complaints have anything to do
with the reason for the original performance
problem.

> I could get a login prompt and entered my
> password [...]

Were you "root" or some peon user when you
did this?

> [...] but could not gain access. [...]

What, exactly, does this mean? Did
_anything_ happen after the password was put
in?

> I tried the system console to no avail.

Again, an accurate, precise description of
what you did, and what happened when you did
it, might be more helpful than a vague
description.

> Does anyone know what can be do to prevent
> this in the future.

Hard to say, until someone figures out what
the actual problem was. Many things are
possible. A user with an NFS-remote home
directory can suffer from NFS problems. Any
user can suffer from problems in his shell
start-up scripts (.profile, ...). The system
could be very busy doing something of great
(or little) value. And so on.

Try to collect more useful info if it recurs?
Bob Manocchia
Regular Advisor

Re: Orphaned Inodes

I was using putty and entered my own user id and password. It did not go any further than that. On the system console I received no prompt at all.