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Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary

naths
Occasional Contributor

Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary

could some tell me what I need to do for this kind of errors.
Disk /dev/mapper/mpath317: 8587 MB, 8587837440 bytes
64 heads, 32 sectors/track, 8190 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 2048 * 512 = 1048576 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/mapper/mpath317p1 1 1020 1044193+ 83 Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/mapper/mpath317p2 1020 2040 1044225 83 Linux
/dev/mapper/mpath317p3 2040 3060 1044225 83 Linux
/dev/mapper/mpath317p4 3060 8190 5253255 5 Extended
/dev/mapper/mpath317p5 3060 4080 1044193+ 83 Linux
/dev/mapper/mpath317p6 4080 5099 1044193+ 83 Linux
/dev/mapper/mpath317p7 5099 6119 1044193+ 83 Linux
/dev/mapper/mpath317p8 6119 7139 1044193+ 83 Linux
/dev/mapper/mpath317p9 7139 8159 1044193+ 83 Linux
1 REPLY
Matti_Kurkela
Honored Contributor

Re: Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary

The message is related to old-style Cylinder/Head/Sector addressing, which is totally obsolete today. Modern disks use LBA addressing: the computer tells the disk which blocks it wants by specifying a block number (just one number, which can be very large) and the disk itself figures out the cylinder/head/sector coordinates for it.

This allows more flexible disk geometries (e.g. the outer cylinders/tracks are longer and can hold more sectors than the inner tracks, which is important for modern high-capacity disks).

If your computer is very old and cannot do LBA at the BIOS level, you might have problems booting from a partition that displays this message. If this is not a system disk, you can safely ignore the error.

If your computer is manufactured in year 2002 or later, you can usually completely ignore it.

MK
MK